Wilfred Joseph (Bob) Etue, WW II Veteran, Canadian Army M103113

Male 1924 - 1995  (70 years)


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  • Name Wilfred Joseph (Bob) Etue, WW II Veteran, Canadian Army M103113 
    Nickname Bob 
    Born 28 Dec 1924  St. Joseph, Huron, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 1924 or 1925 
    Gender Male 
    Died 13 Oct 1995 
    Buried Baxter/Turton plot, Colborne Cemetery, Goderich, Huron, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2081  Default
    Last Modified 19 Oct 2020 

    Father Wilfred Joseph Louis Etue,   b. 4 Nov 1902, St Pierre aux Bouleaux, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1929, Gravenhurst Sanitarium, Muskoka Twp, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 26 years) 
    Mother Mary Maizie Overholt,   b. 1902,   d. 6 Nov 1983, Toronto, York County, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 30 Jan 1922 
    Family ID F685  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ethel Elizabeth May Turton,   b. 1 Jan 1928, Goderich, Huron, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 Oct 2002, Cambridge Memorial Hospital, Cambridge, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Married 27 Nov 1947  Motherwell, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. William Joseph Etue,   b. 4 Apr 1949,   d. 4 Apr 1949  (Age 0 years)
    +2. Living
    +3. Living
    +4. Living
    +5. Living
    +6. Living
    Last Modified 14 Feb 2012 
    Family ID F703  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 28 Dec 1924 - St. Joseph, Huron, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 27 Nov 1947 - Motherwell, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Baxter/Turton plot, Colborne Cemetery, Goderich, Huron, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    1939-1945 Star
    1939-1945 Star
    The Star was awarded for six months service on active operations for Army and Navy, and two months for active air-crew between 02 September 1939 and 08 May 1945 (Europe) or 02 September 1945 (Pacific). Battle of Britain: This bar was awarded to those members of the crews of fighter aircraft who took part in the Battle of Britain between 10 July and 31 October 1940. The ribbon consists of three equal stripes: dark blue, red, and light blue (representing the navy, army and air force).
    France and Germany Star
    France and Germany Star
    awarded for military service overseas during WW II. The Star was awarded for one day or more of service in France, Belgium, Holland or Germany between 06 June 1944 (D-Day) and 08 May 1945.
    War Medal 1939-1945 with oak leaf.
    War Medal 1939-1945 with oak leaf.
    awarded for military service overseas during WW II. The Star was awarded for six months service on active operations for Army and Navy, and two months for active air-crew between 02 September 1939 and 08 May 1945 (Europe) or 02 September 1945 (Pacific).
    Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with Clasp
    Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with Clasp
    awarded for military service overseas during WW II. The Canadian Volunteer Service Medal is granted to persons of any rank in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Canada who voluntarily served on Active Service and have honourably completed eighteen months (540 days)(18 mths) total voluntary service from September 3, 1939 to March 1, 1947.
    Defence Medal WW II
    Defence Medal WW II

    Documents
    Lance Corporal (L/Cpl) Wilfred J. Etue WW2 veteran
    Lance Corporal (L/Cpl) Wilfred J. Etue WW2 veteran
    Legion Last Post entry
    Death Record: Wilfred Joseph Louis Etue 25 Jun 1929
    Death Record: Wilfred Joseph Louis Etue 25 Jun 1929
    son of John Etue & Johanna Denomme
    Death Record #982 TB Sanitorium Hospital, Gravenhurst, District of Muskoka, Muskoka Township, Ontario, Canada.
    Pulmonary Tuberculosos

    Headstones At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    William J. Etue 1949-1949 4 Apr.
son of Wilfred & Ethel Etue
    William J. Etue 1949-1949 4 Apr. son of Wilfred & Ethel Etue

    Histories
    Wilfred Joseph 'Bob' Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Wilfred Joseph "Bob" Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Family History page 1
    Wilfred Joseph 'Bob' Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Wilfred Joseph "Bob" Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Family History page 2
    Wilfred Joseph 'Bob' Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Wilfred Joseph "Bob" Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Family History page 3
    Wilfred Joseph 'Bob' Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Wilfred Joseph "Bob" Etue & Ethel Elizabeth May Turton
    Family History Page 4 and continues on Page 5...
    "descendants will have a picture of the times in which we lived and what kind of people we are. I will endeavour to keep these records up to date while I am able. I wonder who will continue this task when I am gone "......
    Family History written by Ethel (Turton) Etue and her daughter Elizabeth "Betty" (Etue) Trethewey.
    Thank you ladies

  • Notes 
    • Wilfred (Bob) joined the Canadian Army as a Private (Pte) and was promoted to Lance Corporal (L/Cpl)during WW 2. L/Cpl Etue served with the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) and was re-badged to Seaforth Highlanders of Canada (their motto: CUIDICH'N RIGH (Help the King) during his military service. This is the same Regiment that Canadian Victoria Cross recipient; Sergeant Ernest Alvia Smokey Smith (1914-2005)served in. Both Units were Infantry Regiments. Bob's Regimental Number was: M103113. For his service he should have received the following medals and decorations: 1939-1945 Star, The Italy Star, The France & Germany Star, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal (CVSM) with Clasp (awarded for 60 days or more service outside Canada), The War medal 1939-1945 and a Medal for Bravery (The Military Medal?).

      The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada was part of the 2nd Infantry Brigade of the 1st Canadaian Infantry Division.

      WW 2 "dog-tags" were three disks approx 3 cm in diameter; one disk was to be attached to the body of the fallen military member, one disk was send to the family and the third disk was retained by the Government with the military member's records in casuality cases.

      Bob was cremated and buried in the Baxter/Turton plot in the older section (last gate East) of the Colborne Cemetery.

      The following entry appears in the Canadian Legion magazine of Apr 1996: Etue, Lance Corporal (L/Cpl), Wilfred J. Service Number: M103113, Seaforth Highlanders of Canada WW II, Date of death 13 Oct 1995. www.legionmagazine.com

      HISTORY OF THE SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA
      The Beginning:
      The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada was first established on November 24, 1910 by a group of Vancouverites of Scottish descent. Upon official affiliation with the Seaforth Highlanders of the British Imperial Army, the "72nd Highlanders of Canada" was redesignated the "72nd Seaforth Highlanders of Canada" on April 15, 1912 and the "72nd Regiment Seaforth Highlanders of Canada" on December 16, 1912. The Regiment received its first stand of colours from the Governor-General, HRH the Duke of Connaught, in 1912.

      World War I:
      At the outbreak of World War 1, the eager young Regiment offered itself for overseas service. The offer was refused until 1916; a total of 41 officers and 1,637 other ranks were drafted to other Canadian infantry units, in particular the 16th Battalion CEF. The Regiment perpetuated the 72nd Battalion which would later be attached to the 12th Brigade, 4th Canadian Division, and the 231st Battalion, which provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.

      In 1916, however, the Regiment sailed for France as the 72nd Battalion CEF, and very soon Seaforths were committed to battle. The 72nd quickly gained a reputation among friend and foe for its professional conduct, and particularly, for patrolling and aggressive trench raids.

      The Regiment paid a heavy cost in blood during its numerous actions in the war. At Vimy Ridge, the 72nd helped spearhead the attack that won Canadian troops their reputation as the finest shock troops on the Allied side - but after the battle, only 11 officers and 62 men remained. The battle of Passchendaele saw the Regiment advance, before dawn, up a gully waist deep in mud in the pouring rain to capture its objective - which British generals had assessed as requiring a full Division of 15,000 soldiers.

      When the veterans returned to Vancouver they brought with them sixteen battle honours. This recognition of courage did nothing to dispel the fact that, of the 3,791 officers and men who served as Seaforths during the war, 2,515 of them became casualties.

      The Regiment received its second stand of colours from Lt. Gen Sir Arthur Currie on April 1, 1919. Redesignated "The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada" on September 15, 1920, the Regiment forged ahead in efficiency during the inter-war period and was selected to become a part of the 1st Canadian Division. Upon the start of the Second World War, the Regiment was mobilized as "The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, C.A.S.F." and embarked for the United Kingdom on the December 22, 1939.

      World War II:
      Stationed in England for the next three years, the Seaforths primarily carried out coastal defence tasks while training to join the fight. The Regiment's baptism of fire came on the July 10, 1943, in the Operation HUSKY landings in Sicily. Before the Sicilian campaign was complete, the Seaforths had added Leonforte, Agira, and Adrano to their list of battle honours. The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada were part of the 2nd Infantry Division of the 1st canadian Infantry Division.

      It was at the Town of Ortona, on the east coast of Italy, in December 1943 that the Seaforths achieved their most lasting fame - and indeed 'wrote the book' on urban combat for the Canadian Army. The merciless street fighting lasted a week. During the battle, Seaforth companies rotated out of the line to celebrate Christmas dinner in a ruined church - for many Seaforths, it was their last meal. In honour of this courage, the Regiment has celebrated this dinner every year since. The Regiment continued its success by breaching the "impregnable" Hitler Line - but every single officer in the field became a casualty. Incidentally, the Seaforths suffered the highest officer casualty rate of any Canadian unit in World War II.

      The Seaforths slogged through the Italian mud and fought for another year. On October 21-22, 1944, Private Ernest Alvia "Smokey" Smith earned the Victoria Cross for single-handedly repulsing a German tank and infantry counter-attack while moving a wounded comrade to safety. Earlier in the war, Seaforth Lieutenant Colonel Cecil Merritt, while serving as Commanding Officer of the South Saskatchewan Regiment, also won the Victoria Cross at Dieppe.

      After the Italian campaign, the Seaforths moved to North-West Europe in March 1945. The Regiment finished the last few months of the war clearing German forces from the Scheldt Estuary in Holland, and upon the German surrender, were the first Allied unit to enter the city of Amsterdam.

      By the end of the Second World War, the Seaforths had collected a total of 25 battle honours. On the June 1, 1945, the 2nd Battalion of the Seaforths, which had spent the war in Home Defence tasks, was mobilized as the "2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion (The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada)" for service in the invasion of Japan. Thankfully, the war came to an end before this invasion was mounted, and this unit was finally demobilized on the 1st of November 1945.

      When the victorious Seaforths returned home to Vancouver, over 200,000 people turned out to welcome them home, lining the streets from the train station to the Armoury on Burrard Street. Following the war, the Seaforths reverted to peace-time Reserve status, but continued training for civil defence tasks, and the Regiment even provided a rifle company that served with the Highland Brigade in Germany as part of Canada's NATO contribution.

      Post-World War II:
      Since the Second World War, Seaforth Highlanders have served in every major Canadian overseas mission, both as peacekeepers and warfighters. Seaforths served in Egypt, Cyprus, Iraq, the Golan Heights, Namibia, Croatia, Bosnia, and today over half of the Regiment are veterans of the war in Afghanistan. The Regiment truly continues to display the pride and esprit de corps that has set it apart through its history.