Michael Ryder

Male 1828 - 1877  (49 years)


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  • Name Michael Ryder 
    Born 1828  Newport, County Mayo, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Resided 1861  Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Resided 1862  Division Street, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Resided 1874  Cherry and Trafalgar, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Resided 1876  Dufferin Street, St. Catharines, Lincoln, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Resided 1877  Race Street, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 9 Nov 1877  St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I111  Default
    Last Modified 10 Sep 2021 

    Father Daniel Ryder,   b. 1780, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1867, Newport, County Mayo, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Photos
    Camcloon Beg, 1855 Griffith's Valuation
    Camcloon Beg, 1855 Griffith's Valuation
    The Daniel Ryder family was at #15 on the map
    Family ID F614  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Rose Joyce,   b. 1837, Swinford, County Mayo, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Mar 1885, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years) 
    Notes 
    • Notes from Paul Edwin Daggett, son of William Smith Daggett and Anne Ryder:

      My mother, Anne Ryder, was born in St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1869, the daughter of Michael Ryder and his wife, Rose Joyce. The baptismal record shows her name as Hanna, though I believe it truly was Honor Teresa. She told me that she had been christened Honor, or possibly Hanorah. For some reason she did not care for either of these and was always known as Anne. The baptismal record is in error in at least one respect; it mistakenly records her father's name as Michael Ryan, rather than Ryder, so possibly her name was listed incorrectly.

      Her father, Michael Ryder, was born in Newport, on Clew Bay, County Mayo, Ireland, in 1828. Unfortunately it has not been possible to procure a copy of his baptismal record. The Parish Priest of Newport reports that there is a gap in the Parish register from 1826 to 1846.

      As a very young man he enlisted in the British Army, where he served in various parts of the world for twelve years. His service included the Crimean War, which was in the years 1854 to 1856. It well might be that this army service could have been motivated, at least in part, by the Famine which occurred in the period 1845 to 1849, that appalling state of misery and hunger which is beyond description in this short recital. Foillowing his army service he drew a pension until his accidental death in St. Catharines, Ontario, at the age of 49, on November 9, 1877.

      My grandmother, Rose Joyce, was born in Swinford, County Mayo, Ireland, in 1837. Her birthplace was only some 30 miles from Newport; nevertheless, she and her future husband did not know each other in Ireland. They met on shipboard while emigrating to America. It is not known whether they were married during the voyage, or after reaching this country, but the latter seems the most likely course for two Irish Catholics.

      A letter from the Parish Priest at Swinford informed me that in this case, just as happened at Newport, there is no record of baptisms during the period when Rose Joyce was born.

      Where they landed is not known. It could have been New York, or Boston. Some vessels landed in Canada, although most came to the United States.

      Michael Ryder's brother John had preceded them to America and was located in Louisville, Kentucky, where he owned a teaming outfit. This probably accounts for my grandparents going to Louisville. The year is not known, but their son, my uncle John J. Ryder, was born there in 1863. A daughter, Mary, was also born there, but she died in infancy.

      During the Civil War, Michael Ryder joined the Union Army. Because of his military experience he became a drill sergeant and was stationed in New York. While there it became known that he was really a British subject, and that ended his service.

      A letter from my cousin, Mary Erhard, daughter of John J. Ryder, informed me that Michael Ryder had been active as a "slave runner", in the so-called underground railway. He was violently opposed to all forms of tyranny and oppression; this explains his motivation in helping slaves reach Canada and freedom of a sort. Possibly this experience may have prompted moving the family to St. Catharines, Ontario.

      In St. Catharines the following children were born:
      Catherine, died in infancy
      James, died in infancy
      Agnes Bridget, born January 12, 1867
      Anne (my mother) born February 4, 1869
      Michael, born in 1871
      Rose, born in 1874

      When grandfather, Michael Ryder, died in 1877, my mother was only 8 years old. In 1885, when grandmother Rose Ryder died, mother was only 16 years old.

      Mother's eldest brother, John J. Ryder, must have been helpful in caring for the younger children of the family. By the time he became 21 years old, he had moved from St. Catharines to St. Paul, where the St. Paul City Directory for 1884 lists him as a printer with the Daily Globe. After his mother's death it appears that he placed his youngest sister, Rose, with the Philbin family in Kenosha, Wisconsin, for some time, perhaps several years. At the same period he brought the other children to St. Paul, for their names appear in the St. Paul City Directory at the time as follows:
      My mother, Anne, 1887 through 1890-1891
      My aunt, Rose, 1890 through 1894
      My aunt, Agnes, 1892
      My Uncle Mike, 1892

      The directory also lists John DeWitt, for 1892, 1893 and 1894. He married Agnes Ryder.

      It is not surprising that my mother's name does not appear in the directory after 1891, for on October 12, 1891, she and my father, William S. Daggett, were married in the St. Paul Cathedral. On January 6, 1893, I was born in St. Paul, in a residence which still stands almost directly across the street from the present Cathedral Rectory on Selby Avenue. Years ago my aunt Agnes told me that she was with my mother the day of my birth, and she recalled that there was a heavy snowfall on that occasion.

      At the time of my parents' marriage, my father was Secretary to the Indian Commissioner at White Earth Reservation in northern Minnesota. Their honeymoon journey took them by train to Detroit (now Detroit Lakes) Minnesota, at that time the rail head. From Detroit to White Earth they traveled by stagecoach, in what they later described as an early season blizzard. For perhaps a year or a little more they remained at the Reservation, but by 1893 they lived in Fargo, North Dakota, where my father was a Deputy U.S. Marshal.
    Children 
    +1. John Joyce Ryder,   b. 25 Jun 1861, Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Aug 1942, Colorado Springs, El Paso, Colorado, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     2. Mary Ryder,   b. Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. James Ryder,   b. Sep 1863, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jun 1864, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 0 years)
    +4. Agnes Bridget Ryder,   b. 12 Jan 1867, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1946, Griswold, Cass, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
    +5. Anne Ryder,   b. 4 Feb 1869, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Sep 1945, St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, Stearns, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     6. Rose Ryder,   b. 14 Aug 1873, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1935, Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     7. Catherine Ryder,   b. 29 Nov 1875, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Aug 1876, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     8. Michael Ryder,   b. 1862,   d. 26 Feb 1914, St. Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)  [Adopted]
    Histories
    Michael Ryder (1828-1877)
    Michael Ryder (1828-1877)
    Last Modified 16 Jan 2010 
    Family ID F32  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1828 - Newport, County Mayo, Ireland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResided - 1861 - Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResided - 1862 - Division Street, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResided - 1874 - Cherry and Trafalgar, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResided - 1876 - Dufferin Street, St. Catharines, Lincoln, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResided - 1877 - Race Street, St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 9 Nov 1877 - St. Catharines, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Notes 
    • Notes from Paul Edwin Daggett, son of William Smith Daggett and Anne Ryder:

      Michael Ryder was born in Newport, County Mayo, in 1828, the exact date unknown. In 1845, the first year of the famine, he was a youth of 17. Connaught, the province which included Mayo, Connemara and Sligo, has been termed the most distressed province in Ireland. During the bitter years of 1845, 1846, and 1847, Michael Ryder must have endured all the hardship occasioned by famine with its accompanying disease. What was his fate, then? How did he live, and where?

      His wife, Rose Joyce, his junior by 9 years, was born in Swinford, County Mayo,in 1837. As a child, she too suffered the pangs of hunger during the famine. However, nothing is known of the parents of either Michael Ryder or Rose Joyce, nor do we know where or when they were married.

      Michael Ryder joined the English army as a very young man, served 12 years in various parts of the world, and drew a pension until his death. We do not know the manner in which he and Rose Joyce were married. They were unacquainted in Ireland but met on the ship coming to America. They could have been married on the ship, or after arrival.

      Michael Ryder's army service included the Crimean War. Since that war lasted from 1854 until the Treaty of Paris in 1856, he would have been 26 to 28 years of age at the time.

      After arrival in America their son John J. Ryder was born in Louisville in 1863. A daughter Mary was also born in Louisville and died there.

      The great ferment about slavery must have had a real effect on Michael Ryder. He joined the Union army, but while stationed as a drill sergeant in New York it came out that he was really a British subject and that ended his service.

      He had been active in the underground railway. As a slave runner he was only evidencing his hatred of oppression and tyranny, which had been nurtured by his own experience in the dread days in Ireland. At this time he moved his family to St. Catharines, Ontario.

      =================================================

      14 Aug 1855 - Examination of Invalid Soldiers
      Michael Ryder, 27 years old, served for 10 years 3 months. Foreign service: 1 year 10 months at Gibraltar; 1 year 6 months at Canada(?); 6 months at Bermuda. Character: Indifferent (versus "Good" for most of his peers). Born in Newport, County Mayo. 5 foot 6 inches tall, blue eyes. Disability or cause of discharge: "Acute catarrhal ophthalmia of both eyes. Not prevalent. From severe cold."

      ==================================================

      29 Dec 1856 - Declaration of Intent to become a citizen of the USA
      Circuit Court within and for the District of Massachusetts
      Michael Ryder, Laborer, born in Newport, County Mayo, Ireland, 28 years old. Arrived at New York 16 Sep 1856

      ===================================================

      Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky, Union Kentucky Volunteers, Schedule A, Cavalry Regiments, Fifth Kentucky Infantry (page 688): Private Michael Ryder, enrolled 1 Sep 1861, mustered in 9 Sep 1861 at Camp Joe Holt, deserted.

      According to the American Civil War Soldiers Database: Private Michael Ryder enlisted on 1 Sep 1861, and was mustered into Company A, Fifth Kentucky Infantry, on 9 Sep 1861. Distinguished Service. He had deserted by 6 Oct 1862.

      25 Jun 1862, Schedule of Convictions, St. Catharines
      Michael Ryder convicted of assault, fined $10

      30 Aug 1863: son James born

      23 Jun 1864: son James died

      Mitchell & Co's General Directory, Town of St Catharines for 1865
      Michael Ryder, pensioner, h Mary, nr. St. Paul

      15 Mar 1865, Return of Convictions, County of Lincoln
      Michael Ryder, drunk and disorderly, fined $2

      3 May 1865: son Michael born

      4 Dec 1865, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Wife Beating: Michael Ryder, an Irishman, fond of the crayter, was arrested on Saturday night for beating his wife. Michael pled guilty to being drunk but promised to amend but in future. Mr. Marren administered a very severe lecture, and it is to be hoped that it will prove effective.

      1866 Niagara Gaol Register
      Michael Ryder, 37 yo Labourer, served 30 days for Assault and Battery, discharged Jan 1866

      1866 Niagara Gaol Register
      Michael Ryder, 38 yo Labourer, served 3 months for Assault and Battery, discharged July 1866

      12 Jan 1867: daughter Agnes Bridget born

      21 Feb 1867, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Whisky and Its Effect: Mrs. Judge was charged by Michael Ryder with demolishing his gate. Michael on facing the music, testified to Mrs. Judge's appetite for ardent spirits, but failed to prove his accusation touching the gate. He departed reluctantly for another witness.

      1867 Niagara Gaol Register
      Michael Rider, 40 yo Labourer, served 21 days for Assault and Battery, discharged August 1867.

      21 Aug 1867, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Michael Ryder was charged by Nathaniel Patterson, with striking him. Fined $5 or 25 days jail.

      30 June 1868, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Michael Ryder was charged by Daird Powers with using abusive language and calling him foul names. Fined $1 or 6 days.

      1 Aug 1868, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Wm. Barrett, a resident of the Patch beyant, was brought up at the instance of a married woman named Rosa Ryder with using obscene and abusive language towards her on the public streets. Barrett denied the charge, and said he could get a witness to prove that he was not guilty. As his witness was not forthcoming his tragedy was deepened to the extent of $2.

      3 Sep 1868, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Police Court: Julia Barrett and her son, James Barrett, a boy 12 years of age, were brought up on a charge of setting fire to the shanty of Michael Ryder on Division street, on the night of the 3rd inst. The shanty was fired from the outside between 11 and 12 o'clock, when a boy gave an alarm and put it out. Mrs. Ryder swore that she saw the boy Barrett on the night in question poke lighted matches through cracks in the boards from the outside of the building, but on account of dampness they did not at that time set fire to the dwelling. When the fire occurred the Ryder family were asleep in bed. On account of the absence of a material witness for plaintiff further hearing was postponed until Monday morning at 10 o'clock.

      7 Sep 1868, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Police Court: Julia Barrett and her son James were brought up on the remand of setting fire to the house of Michael Rider, on Division street, on the 3rd inst. The only witness examined was Alo Holland, who swore that Rider was drunk in bed at the time of the fire, and that she had awakened Mrs. Rider, but saw nobody in the vicinity at the time. His Worship stated, in dismissing the charge, that it was a shame that the woman should have been confined in prison since Friday night, and regretted that he had not the power of punishing Rider, who said that he only brought Mrs. Barrett up on suspicion.

      20 Oct 1868, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Police Court: The usual quiet of Police routine was ended this morning by Michael Rider, the notorious, charging John Courtney with assault and battery. It was shown that Michael had used aggravating language, and therefore Cadi Burns dismissed the charge, which exasperated Rider into using foul language, when he was fined $2, and is now rusticating for lack of the "squidge."

      4 Feb 1869: daughter Anne born

      18 Sep 1869: St. Catharines List of Convictions
      Michael Ryder, Abusive Language, $2 fine

      27 Jan 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: James Freeman and Anthony Garrity were charged by the noble Baron Von Ryder, "wid stealing me bottle uv whiskey, shure, your wurtship," but as Michael was unable to prove the charge, the case was dismissed, and the Baron departed shaking his fist at the culprits. As he reached the door he saluted the Beak with his favorite song "the blanes uv Waterloo," which was cut short by the High C. making a rush for him, causing Michael to decamp in haste.

      21 Feb 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Mysterious Occurrence: On Saturday evening last, the famous Baron Von Ryder went around Town practicing the fine art of paper-hanging on the dead-walls and fences, and having completed the job to his own satisfaction, rested from his labors in the enjoyment of a "noggin av speerits." Next morning, however, the citizens were amused to find all the bills turned upside down, but firmly stuck on to the walls. The Baron who has been writing poetry on the destruction of Sanacherib, avers that:
      "The dimon av fun schwept by on the blast
      And turn thim upside down as he passed."
      He is repeating the work to-day, having first sharpened his vision by a copious inhalation of Paddy's eye-water. It is hoped that the antics of this mischief maker will not prevent a large attendance at the lecture to-morrow night which the bill announced.

      23 Feb 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Birth or Births (?): Last evening the celebrated Baron Von Ryder, a compeer of the illustrious Baron de Camin, rushed into the Times Office bearing on his shoulder the insignia of his rank (a buck-saw), and proudly announced that Lady Ryder had been delivered of "wan schild an' wan dawghter!" What the actual increase of the population amounts to in this case is a matter of uncertainty. (ed. note: Unknown child.)

      10 Mar 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: The noble Baron Von Ryder and his beloved Brudder Payne were early at the Justice Shop this morning. "Shure 'tis meself that loiks to be to the fore, fwhin the fun is goin' on," remarked the Baron. "Faix I'd rather see a naygur in the crib than go widout me bithurs av a mornin."
      "Ise ob 'pinion dat de niggah is too ophten put in de fence," retorted Brudder Payne, with a dark frown of injured dignity mantling his noble brow. "'Spose dey'll soon be sayin dat niggahs ought to climb de pole, and showdar -- like de "Com'n Man' does."
      The Baron was thunderstruck at the "impidence" of this speech, and was just beginning a terrific volley of Tipperary wild-fire, when the Beak was heard approaching, and silence reigned supreme.

      14 Mar 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: The heavy snow storm caused an unusually large gathering of the unwashed around the Justice Shop this morning.
      "Shure we can make wan work av it," said the Baron Von Ryder; "we kin airn a few pince shovelin' the shnow, and thin be in time for the fun inside."
      "Hand hif we wait a little longer, we'll be in time for the grond meeting to-night," chimed in the ex-Mayor of Toronto.
      "Hould your tung, you dirty omadawn," said the Baron; "it makes me blud bile to hear the likes av you goin back on the ould sod, whare you was born, add thryin' to spake like wan av thim haythens av Inglishmin. I've carried me knapsack all over the worlt, since the days I 'listed in the swate town av Nayna, but never a wan of me thried to be anything else but a sun av Tipperary, although me ridgment was so long quathered in the West Indies, that every wan av us became natives av the sile."
      "Ho, but you was never Mayor hof Toronty," said the ex-official dignitary, loftily.
      "But wasn't I more nor that," roared the Baron. "Didn't the Dutchmin call me Baron Von Ryder fwhin I saved Gineral Slockdolager's life at the Battle av Waterloo; an' wouldn't I be there to-day, livin in me grate house an' ridin in me coach-an-four, if the haythens had something besides their dirty laygur beer to drink."
      "What's all this noise about, at any rate," said Chief Montgomery, opening the door. "Silence in the Court!" The Chief then advanced to the Beak's throne, ascended the steps with solemn dignity, glanced over the crowd, and shouted, "No Court to-day."
      "Sould agin!" said the Baron, making for the door, followed by the other hangers on.

      21 Mar 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: There was a magnificent assemblage of the aristocracy of the Patch in attendance at the opening ceremonies today. In fact the opening of the Local Legislature by Governor Howland in his white silk breeches was not to be compared to the scene at the St. Kitt's Justice Shop. Amongst the distinguished personages present we noticed the celebrated Count Peglegs and lady in full dress; Hon. Michael Peglegs, Jr.; The Most Illustrious, His Serene Highness, Baron Michael Von Ryder; two or three African Princes; Sir Patrick Patchton; Capt. Jinks &c., &c., making altogether as gay a collection of blooming nasal organs as could be produced at any Court in the universe.
      His Excellency, after delivering the customary address, requested the High Constable to introduce such persons as desired to be "interviewed." Count Peglegs then advanced and said, "I cum here to aware agin, me sun, yer aner, for stealing me watch, an wallopin' me in me own house. His mother helped him, yer aner, and gave me a polthogue in the side which broke me ribs and took the breath from me."
      Beak (to Lady Peglegs) - "Is this boy your son, madam?"
      Her Ladyship - "Faith an' sure he is, and an anest sun at that."
      A lengthy investigation then ensued, when it appeared that the Needham family, with a few select friends, including the Baron, were enjoying themselves yesterday when a quarrel arose between father and son. The mother took the "by's" part and whaled the husband and father, who them trumped up the charge of watch stealing "to be even wid 'em." The first charge was dismissed, and the charge of assault will be further ventilated to-morrow morning.

      20 May 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: The Hall of Justice was more than usually filled with spectators of all grades, conditions, ages, sexes, nationalities and colors. As a prelude to the usual festivities, the noble Baron Von Ryder sang a charming ballad entitled "The Peeler and the Goat," but was rudely interrupted in the last stanza by the Chief Constable, who poked his glowing proboscis through the half-open door, exclaiming "Be aisy, byes; sure its the divil's own row he're kicking up. What is it all about, at any rate?"...

      21 May 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: "Will de gemman from Nenah gib tis a-stave ob de Boy from Tullamore?" said the venerable Brudder Payne, addressing himself to the Baron Von Ryder, after the very loving couple and their admirers had taken up their usual positions in the Temple of Justice this morning.
      "Och, don't ax me phor that," said the Baron, a modest smile illuminating his handsome fronticepiece, while the digits of his left hand instinctively chased the fleeting flea amid the groves of Blarney on the summit of his cranium. "Shure that was wan av the songs we used to sing fwhin we wint coortin' the gerls in the ould counthry, an' 'tis I that would'nt be afther singin it here phor the world. Shure that schpalpeen av the Times would be puttin' me in the paper agin' if I did; an' me frinds across the wather might hear av id."
      "Well de gemman can sing 'Waterloo' or anyting else to please hisself; enny ob his chunes will be pleasin' to de company," rejoined Brudder Payne, with the brightest of dark glances at the Irish linet, who unable to withstand this delicate compliment to his ability, prepared to warble, by remarking --
      "Faith, I think there must be a blarney sthone in Africa, for shure the haythen's mouth is as schweet as the lips av the gerl I left behind me."
      Brudder P -- "Yah -- yah -- ha yah -- yah!"
      "That's a two-legged horse laugh," said the Baron, as he looked down the great Kentucky cavern which "de brudder" had rudely opened, threatening to engulf the entire audience. Order being restored, the Baron tuned the Harp of Erin.
      "Och, wanst I ne'er did think I'd be
      In this dejected shate,
      Like a poor phorlorn effigy
      Bowed down by fwhiskey straight
      The burds that flutter an the tree
      Wid terror strike me hart,
      Each sthar I see alarms me
      Och, fwhy did I desart?"
      Tremendous applause. The noise brought the Chief Constable from the lower regions, and rushing in, cudgel in hand, he threatened to send them all down if they didn't stop that racket....

      7 Sep 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Aristocratic Fracas: Yesterday afternoon, the aristocratic neighborhood of Upper Division street (we mean the "Patch,") was disturbed considerably by a friendly discussion, "wid shticks," between Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ryder - said discussion having taken place on the lawn in front of their princely abode. During the progress of the discussion, Mr. Ryder merely intending to give emphasis to his remarks, accidentally allowed his "shtick" to fall rather too heavily on the well shaped head dress and auburn tresses of his lovely spouse. Soon, distressing to relate, the beautiful face, alabaster neck and costly attire, were stained by the crimson flood that poured from the wounds caused by the bit of timber already alluded to. Mr. Ryder, in an agony of remorse and dread at the unfortunate turn events had suddenly taken, exclaimed, in agonizing tones: --
      "O willihoo! willihoo! -- wirra! wirra! Biddy, acushla, are ye kilt? Bad cess to the dirty shillela! Sorr a time will I ever touch it again." Then he cast the unlucky cause of the catastrophe to the ground, caught the fair partner of his joys and woes to his manly bosom, strained her in a fond and convulsive embrace, imprinted a kiss on her ruby lips, laid her tenderly on the sward, and then, in company with the Chief of Police, who in the interval had opportunely arrived on the spot, rushed frantically down towards the Lock-up, there to pass the time in gloomy reflections on his domestic sorrows. The faithful Chief, who took to him like a friend of his youth, poured into the ear of the disconsolate Ryder a plentiful stream of consolation for his afflictions. The surgeon who was speedily in attendance on the fair sufferer, has removed a heavy burden of anxiety from our heart by informing us that - thanks to her abstemious habits (she drinks nothing stronger than Stinson's best), fine constitution and (this spoken sotto voce) thick skull - Mrs. Ryder will probably recover.

      7 Sep 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: ...Baron Ryder was charged with assaulting his wife, Rosa Ryder. Remanded till to-morrow.

      8 Sep 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: Baron Ryder was charged with attempting to kill his wife. The proof was deemed sufficient to send Michael to stand his trial at the coming Assizes...

      20 Sep 1870, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Fall Assizes: ...Queen vs. Michael Ryder -- The prisoner was charged with feloneous assault upon his wife with intent to kill. Several witnesses were called to prove the charge, the particulars of which have already appeared in this paper. The jury brought in a verdict "Guilty of common assault." Sentenced to the common jail two months at hard labor.

      1870 Niagara Gaol Register
      Michael Ryder, 45 yo Labourer, served 2 months for Assault and Battery, discharged November 1870

      1871 Census, St. Catharines, Ward #4, Lincoln County, Ontario, Canada
      Michael Ryder, 58 years old, born in Ireland, Roman Catholic, Irish, Laborer.
      Rosey Ryder, 47 years old, born in Ireland.
      John Ryder, 11 years old, born in Ontario.
      Michael Ryder, 9 years old, born in Ontario.
      Bridget Ryder, 4 years old, born in Ontario.
      Ann Ryder, 2 years old, born in Ontario.

      6 Mar 1871, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Police Court: Michael Ryder, one of the Butler-Murphy stock, was brought up on a charge of being drunk and disorderly on Saturday last. He got two months jail. He will be tried to-morrow also on two charges of assault.

      7 Mar 1871, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Police Court: Michael Rider, the notorious, was accused by Chief Montgomery with assault and battery and seraphically (??) in response to the P.M.'s interrogatory "Guilty, yer wurtship, and (??) to me for that same." In adjudging him two months in addition to the two awarded yesterday, the P.M. said that the Rev. Dean Mulligan had informed him that Mike had chased two ladies with a couple of brick bats at the East end of the town, swearing that he would kill them, and that they had escaped by running into a house, and that it was his intention to prosecute the charge. Michael replied, "Plase yer wurtchip, there musht be a mishtake -- shure the loikes o' me wouldn't be afther ill-trutin' a lady, wud I now?" The P.M. oscillated his cranium negatively, and Michael walked.

      7 Mar 1871, St. Catharines Daily Times
      A Nobleman in Trouble: The distinguished Prussian, Baron Von Ryder was charged with assaulting A. Montgomery on Saturday, pleaded guilty and received 2 months in addition to the 2 months he got yesterday. He complained bitterly of the severity of the sentence, and begged to be let out 'at laste' on St. Patrick's day. Upon the refusal of the Court, he consoled himself with the audible reflection that he would "be out on the 12th July anyway."

      (ed. note: July 12 is a holiday commemorating the Irish victory over James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690)

      1871 Niagara Gaol Register
      Michael Ryder, 45 yo Labourer, served 2 months for Assault, discharged 5 July 1871

      11 Jan 1873, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Uncle Tom's Cabin: This wonderful creation of Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe was performed last night by Mr. Herndon and his star performers. Notwithstanding the severity of the weather, the people will come out to hear and see this superb entertainment. The parts were all well sustained last evening. Mr. Herndon was especially happy representing the Yankee school master, who tried almost every conceivable thing to raise the wind when down south. Little Nellie rendered that beautiful character, "Eva," in a manner that shows her to be really a "wonderful child artiste." Mrs. Miller, as "Topsy," was very well received, as was also Mrs. Herndon in the several parts which she carried. Mr. Ward carried his two parts extremely well, and Mr Ryder, as "Deacon Perry," was repeatedly applauded. Henly rendered "Uncle Tom" in a very excellent manner, being specially successful in giving the emotional. In fact all did very well, and afforded much pleasure to the audience.

      6 Aug 1873, St. Catharines Daily Times

      Local and General: ..."Fwhat with whate and mate so high," says the Baron Von Ryder, "a boy can't afford to drink nothing betther nor cider."

      14 Aug 1873: daughter Rose born

      21 Aug 1873, St. Catharines Daily Times
      We are requested by Mr. Michael Ryder, a prominent citizen of St. Catharines, to announce to the Chicago press and public that he entirely disapproves of the conduct of a very near relative whose associations here are bringing disgrace on the fair name of Ryder. He says that the said relative has a legal undivorced wife in Chicago, and has no right to abandon her and seek new associations here. The Baron feels keen remorse and sorrow, and greatly fears his own children may suffer from the stain which is brought upon the family.

      (ed. note: The visitor was likely Michael's brother Martin, who lived in Chicago for many years.)

      27 Aug 1873, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Local and General: ... On Baron Ryder remarking that John A. was "a soup of a juvenile," we inquired if that remark was commendatory or condemnatory. The Baron said he meant John was "a broth of a boy." How these aristocrats uphold.

      4 Dec 1873, St. Catharines Evening Journal
      Police Court: Rose Ryder was charged by P.C. O'Keefe, with being drunk and disorderly. He found her last night about 10 o'clock lying in the mud in rear of the Saw Works, with an infant about 3 months old in her arms. She was discharged owing to a flaw in the information. (ed note: infant likely Rose, born Aug 1873)

      4 Dec 1873, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: Rose Ryder, drunk and disorderly - discharged.

      Directory for St. Catharines, 1874
      Rider, Michael Baron von, pensioner, Cherry street

      1874 St. Catharines Assessment Roll
      Michael Ryder, $200 Real Estate

      2 Sep 1874, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: Mr. Michael Ryder for taking home a horse belonging to Mr. Thomas McCarthy without asking permission, was sent to rusticate in Castle Hamilton. One drunk was discharged.

      3 Dec 1874, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: Mike Ryder, for assaulting his neighbors, was sent two months to the Central Prison.

      Directory for St. Catharines, 1875-76
      Rider, Michael, laborer, Dufferin

      27 Jul 1875, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Fire: Just as we were going to press an alarm of fire was given. The fire was found to be on Cherry street, corner of Trafalgar. The buildings burned up to this writing were a frame house occupied by Mike Ryder, and a number of out-buildings in the rear of J.V. Lepper's boarding house. The damage will not be very great. Fortunately the adjoining buildings were saved.

      29 Jul 1875, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Ryder's Loss: Mr. Michael Ryder, who was burned out at the recent fire, says his losses were very heavy. He lost all his clothing, beds, and other things too numerous to mention, and hadn't a dollar insurance on them. Mike feels down in the mouth and says he has now to commence his life over again. He says $50 wouldn't cover his losses.

      9 Aug 1875, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Thanks: Mr. Mike Ryder wishes to return his sincere thanks for the kindness he has received from the people of St. Catharines since he was burned out. He says he had no idea that so much generosity and kindness existed here.

      10 Sep 1875, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Police Court: Michael Ryder, charged with trespassing on the property of Mr. Moyers, 2 months in jail.

      29 Nov 1875, St. Catharines Daily Times
      Born: This morning, 29th inst, the wife of Michael Ryder, Esq., of a son.

      1 Dec 1875, St. Catharines Daily Times
      An unfortunate man named Michael Ryder had a narrow escape from being frozen to death yesterday morning. He lay in the ditch on George street for about three hours, in a helpless state of intoxication and but for the compassionate assistance rendered by three or four kind-hearted men in that neighborhood, Michael would certainly have suffered the "extreme penalty" of his incurable appetite for whiskey.

      24 Aug 1876: daughter Catherine death

      General Directory for Town of St. Catharines, 1877-1878
      Rider, Michael, laborer, Race street (ed. note: Per Paul Hutchinson, maintainer of the Niagara Newspaper Index: "In the listing of people by house in order on each street -- an unusual feature -- no entry appears for Michael Ryder on Race Street, a short street with only a few houses. The reason could be that he was living in part of someone else's house.")

      Vital Statistics death record:
      Michael Ryder. Died 10 Nov 1877. 49 years old. Occupation: Laborer. Born in Ireland. Cause of death: Accidentally Drowned. Informant: John Ryder.

      Gazetteer and Business Directory of Lincoln and Welland Counties for 1879
      Ryder Michael Mrs., wid, h 2 Court

      General Directory for Town of St. Catharines, 1881-1882
      Ryder, Mrs., widow Michael, h. Division near Geneva