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1 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3391)
 
2

O'HEARN, Ella M. (O'SULLIVAN)
Peacefully, with her family by her side, at the Wildwood Care Centre, Saint Marys? on Monday, March 13, 2006 Ella M. (O'SULLIVAN) O'HEARN in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Edmund J. O'HEARN (1981.) Loving mother of Deanna HART and Vince of London, Donna STACEY of Saint Marys, Jim O'HEARN and Carolyne of Canmore, Alberta, Mike O'HEARN of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Mary O'HEARN, Beverley GRAFF and Laurence, Margaret THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Ron all of Saint Marys, Joseph O'HEARN and wife Ann of Harmony. Dear mother-in-law of Anne Marie O'HEARN of Calgary. She was much loved by 20 grandchildren, 12 great grandchildren, sisters Margaret WHITTON and Ursula O'SULLIVAN of Brampton and Sister Dolores of London. Ella was predeceased by a son Gerald O'HEARN (2001) and a son-in-law Keith STACEY (2000). Resting at the L.A. Ball Funeral Chapel, 7 Water Street North Saint Marys on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Holy Name of Mary Church in Saint Marys on Thursday March 16, 2006 at 11 a.m. with Rev. Fr. Thomas MOONEY officiating, assisted by Deacon Mark STAGG. Interment will follow in Saint Marys Cemetery. In her memory donations to the charity of one's own choice would be appreciated.
Ella Edith O'Sullivan was buried from L.A. Ball Funeral Chapel, St. Mary's, Ontario following a Mass of Christian Burial at Holy Name of Mary Church, St. Mary's, Ontario, Canada. 
O'Sullivan, Ella Edith (I2535)
 
3 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3600)
 
4
Marie, like her sister Agnes, died of a brain tumor when her girls were young. 
Etue, Marie Josephine (I2000)
 
5 Souvenons nous! We will remember you all! Royal Canadian Air Force WW II
Aircraft LV831 Heavy Bomber Halifax III Gutsy Gerty 427 Squadron #6 Air Group
Rank First name Surname Military ID # Position
P/O Frank Gerrard Devereaux J19592 RCAF Pilot, buried in Baisy-Thy Communal Cemetery, Belgium.
P/O Norman David Lesley Stephenson J86797 RCAF Navigator, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
F/O Roy Douglas Ford J27225 RCAF Bomber, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
Sgt Basil Roach no data RAF Flight Engineer, UK, 427 RCAF Sqdn son of Walter Ernest & Maud E. Roach, Ruislip, Middlesex, England, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
P/O John Francis Brown J86751 RCAF Wireless Air Gunner, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
Sgt Richard Edwards no data RAF Air Gunner, 427 RCAF Sqdn, son of Richard & Annie Edwards, Holyhead, Anglesey, England, buried in Baisy-Thy Communal Cemetery, Belgium.
P/O Kenneth Lorne Patience J88720 RCAF Air Gunner, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.

Aircraft MZ295 Heavy Bomber Halifax III 429 Squadron #6 Air Group
Rank First name Surname Military ID # Country
P/O Carmen Vincent Ross J187240 RCAF Pilot, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
429 Sqdn Age 23 son of Gordon W & Alice M Ross, White Rock, BC, Canada, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery in Belgium.
P/O Elmer Lincoln Bailey J90239 RCAF Navigator,buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
F/O Moses Rabovsky J28696 RCAF Bomber 429 Sqdn, Age 26 son of Nathan & Goldie Rabovsky, Owen Sound, ON, Canada, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium. buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
Sgt Norman Hornby no data RAF Flight Engineer, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
P/O Bruce Dunlop J88861 RCAF Wireless Air Gunner, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
P/O Paul Everett Coltman J90922 RCAF Air Gunner, buried in Heverlee War Cemetery, Belgium.
P/O Lloyd Kirton J88776 RCAF Air Gunner, buried in Baisy-Thy Communal Cemetery, Belgium.
-----------------------------------------------------------
P/O Pilot Officer
F/O Flying Officer
Sgt Sergeant
RCAF Royal Canadian Air Force (Canada).
RAF Royal Air Force (England)United Kingdom.
RAFVR Royal Air Force Voluntary Reserve (England) United Kingdom.
Crashed at 2:30 am (0230 hrs) on 28 May 1944.
 
Devereaux, WW II Veteran RCAF, Frank Gerrard (I4334)
 
6
PRIESTAP Peacefully at Avalon Retirement Home, Orangeville, on Monday March 5,2007 Mrs. Vera Priestap formerly of Clinton in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Oscar Priestap. Loving mother of Patricia & Paul Merrow of Adelaide, Australia, Paul & Shelley Priestap of London, and Brenda & Tony Rosati of Orangeville. Cherished grandmother of Lee & Ashley Merrow, Kelsey & Kurtis Priestap, Jake, Luke, & Matt Rosati. Dear Sister in law of Anne & Jim Devereaux of Goderich, and Ruth Priestap of Sebringville. Also missed by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Joe, John, & Louis Wild, and by sister Mary Etue. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Homes, 153 High St. Clinton, on Friday from 2-4 & 7-9 p.m. Mass of the Christian Burial will be held at the Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, Clinton, on Saturday March 10, 2007 at 11 a.m. Spring interment Clinton Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy memorial donations to the Heart & Stroke Foundation, CNIB, or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be greatly appreciated. Published in The London Free Press Mar 8, 2007. Pallbearers were: Bill Wild, Peter Etue, Pat Wild, Joe Wild (all nephews), Vince Young (first cousin) and Stephen Flynn (son of Rita Flynn a life long friend of Vera)

Vera Wild attended Bayfield School 1933-34 - Upper Room - Teacher - Isabel Kirk.
Back row: Harry Brandon, Isabel Kirk (Teacher), Emma Sturgeon, Vera Wild, Evelyn Gemeinhardt, Betty Brandon, Doris Featherstone, June Brandon, Clara Clarke, Pauline Maxwell, Lorna Westlake, Pearl Lindsay, Irene Leitch and Mary Jean Moorhouse.
Front row: William Osborne, John Macleod, Jim Attwood, Stuart Sturgeon, Jack Murray, Charlie Brandon, Ken Castle, Ken Brandon, Bill Westlake Ford Johnston, Albert Osborne, Bill Reid and Peter Johns. (Class picture to be posted later) 
Wild, Veronica (Vera) Agnes (I396)
 
7
Obituary: Dickson, Beth. At Maitland Manor in Goderich on Friday, October 23, 2015 in her 90th year. Beloved mother of Arlene and Ralph Curran of Goderich, Diane Ladouceur of Stratford, and Wendy Dickson of London. Cherished Grandma of Susan, Michael (Rhonda) and Denise Curran, and Nicole and Sharisse (Patrick) Ladouceur. Great Grandmother of Haley and Lyndsey MacLennan, Jacob and Joslynn Curran, Danny and Tanisha Curran, Marcus and Liam Lennon. Predeceased by her husband Allan, great grandson Timothy MacLennan, sons-in-law Garry Ladouceur and David Atkins. The family would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to the Maitland Manor Staff, CCAC workers (Pat, Letitia, Rosalie & Jan) and the Goderich Place staff for their amazing support and compassion. A visitation will be held on Monday, October 26th, 2015 at the Lakeshore United Church (56 North Street, Goderich) from 4 ? 8 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Tuesday, October 27th, 2015 at the Lakeshore United Church at 11 a.m. Interment at Dungannon Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Alzheimer's Society or the Huron Branch OSPCA. You are invited to sign Beth's online book of condolences at www.mccallumpalla.ca
 
Hayden, Elizabeth (I4491)
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F1364
 
9 Earl worked as a Stevadore on the boats in Pugwash Harbour and as a Labourer wherever work was available. Earl was 67 years old, or in his 68th year, when he died. Dingle, Earl Lynwood (I2203)
 
10 ID: I01167
иа Name: William Crowder 1
иа Sex: M
иа Birth: 1730 in Virginia, USA 1
иа Death: UNKNOWN in Haldimand Twp., Northumberland County, Ontario 1
иа Note:
Notes for William Crowder:

William came to the Colony of New York, around 1745. He married Hannah Rous a Dutch girl who lived near Albany, New York. Hannah and William lived in Kinderhook, New York until 1775. In this village there is a Dutch Reformed Church where several of their children were baptised.During the French and Indian Wars, William was a member of the New York Militia, serving in Captain Schyler's Company in 1775 and in Captain Van Vaeghten's Company in 1760. When the American Revolution broke out in 1776, William and Hannah, with their family, fled to Canada. William and his four oldest sons, joined Sir John Johnson's Royal Regiment at Niagara, while Hannah and the younger childen stayed near Montreal and Point Claire. In 1784, with the war ended, the time had come to disband the army and the soldiers met with their families at Johnstown (now Cornwall) just below the rapids. The land here on the north shore of the St.Lawrence River had just been surveyed into 200 acre lots in preparation for land grants to discharged soldiers. The soldiers drew slips of paper from a hat showing which lot they were to have and these records show which lots were allotted to the Crowders. William drew lot number 8 on Concession 1 in the Township of Charlottenburg. Here he proceeded to clear land and build a cabin for himself, his wife and their youngest child. A little later William made a claim registered in Britain as United Empire Loyalists, for property he had lost in New York. The above notes courtesy of Harold E. Crowder, 75 Fauquier Ave. Sault St. Marie, Ontario, P6B 2P2.
Norman & Ruth Crowder, 22 Canter Blvd, Nepean, Ontario K2G 2M2, compiled September 1983, the family tree for William & Hannah's Children. Crowder's book published 1984 puts Charles on William 3rd. line. So where does Charles belong?
From the Dutch Reformed Church of Kinderhook, Columbia County, New York State USA.James born 11 February 1749, son to William Crouder & Hannah Rous. Sponsors, Jochim Valkemburg _ Cate Gardenier. From Trinity Church Parish, New York City (including the Mohawk Valley Area - Albany.
Anthony born 17 November 1751 s/o William Crowder & Hannah Rous.Sponsors: Louwrenz Van Dyck and Mar ytje Van Dyck.
William: b. 21 August 1768 s/o William Crowder and Hannah Rous. Sponsors: Albart Blom & Deborah Perry.
Elizabeth: bpt. 6 October 1771 d/o William Crowder & Hannah Rous. Dutch Reformed Church Schodack, Rensselaer County.
Sponsors: Coorad Rous and Catharine Vander Pool. (his wife)
New York State Historian Report for 1897: Crouder (Croudser, Crowder, Creuder) William. A muster roll of the men raised and passed in the County of Albany for Captain Van Veghten's company May the 1st. 1760. William Crowder enlisted 4th. April, age 30, born Virginia, Laborer. Volunteer out of States company of Militia, enlisted by Captain Van Veghten, 5'1/2", dark complexion gray eyes, black hair.
P643: 1775 Captain Phillip Schuyler's company. Private Will,m Croudser - mustered then in the regiment of the foot raised in the pay & service of the Province of New York, commanded by the Hon. ll James Delancey Esqr., Commander in chief of said province. One captain, two lieuts, four sarg'ts, three corp'ls, one drummer and eighty nine private centinals _ in the manner of Renselaerwyck of the County of Albany this 10th. day of June 1755.
P668: Muster Roll of Captain Philip Schuyler's co.,encamped at the Flat s August 3, 1775. William Crouder, Pvt. in actual service from 1st. July to 31st. Aug. 1 - 31 William Crouder, Pvt. 1 - 3 Sept. 1 - 30 William Crouder, 1 - 3 at Lake George. Wm. Grender 23 days 4-6-3 enl. June 9 Will,m Crowder William Crouder 32 days 1st. Nov. 1755 to 2nd. Dec.
(Most of above refers to service in the French & Indian Wars) 
Crowder (Senior), William (I3802)
 
11 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2968)
 
12 "Omaha Memories: Recollections of Events, Men and Affairs in Omaha, Nebraska, from 1879 to 1917" by Edward Francis Morearty. Published by Swartz printing co., 1917:
One of the most daring and brazen holdups that ever took place in Omaha was that at a place of residence of Hazel McVey, a resort of ill-repute at Fifteenth and Chicago Streets. Three bandits entered the house about 11 o'clock at night and cut the 'phone wires; one locked the landlady in the kitchen, robbed her of her diamonds, while the other two commanded all the inmates to throw up their hands and submit to a frisk. A young man named Nichols, failing to comply with orders, was shot and instantly killed. The bandits were all apprehended, having been located in different states, were brought back, tried and given sentences of imprisonment for life. In this place were some of Omaha's most prominent citizens who, by one pretense after another, managed not to have their identity known. As a result of the McVey robbery, John Ryder, who was in charge of the police department, offered his resignation, but a compromise was reached, whereby Commissioner Kugel was given the police department and Ryder that of street repairs.

17 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald
Confronted by a fatal tragedy in a house of commercialized vice - a thing which Police Superintendent Ryder only recently declared to be non-existent in Omaha - heads of the police department refused to accept the evidence of the existence of disorderly houses and parried all questions as to what action they would take as a result of the affair. Police Commissioner Ryder was exceedingly loath to talk of the matter. He said so several times in reply to questions as to what activities might be expected of the police as a result of the events of last night.
"Will Hazel McVey's resort be closed?" was the direct question put to him yesterday.
"I don't care to discuss the matter," he said.
"But it is easy to say whether or not the police will allow the place to run tonight, or in the future," was suggested.
"You'll have to investigate and find out," Mr. Ryder answered. "The newspapers have just as full opportunities for investigation as I have."
"Do you still think, in the light of Thursday night's developments, that commercialized vice does not exist in Omaha?"
"Why, I don't know any more about it than you do. This affair proves nothing. Why ask me? The newspapers can find out conditions just as well as I can."
"Will the police act any more energetically than they have in the past to stamp out the disorderly houses?" was a question to which Mr. Ryder replied: "As I have stated before my idea of this (unintelligible) and the police have been (unintelligible) it as they have found it. They have the same orders they have always had."
"The orders are, of course, to enforce the law?"
"Of course. but I won't talk of this further."...

17 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald
A persistent rumor that city commissioners are considering a change in the headship of the police department, following recent evidence of criminal activity without effective interference, is current about the city hall. Despite denials of city commissioners, when talking to newspaper reporters, persons close to the administration profess to place some credence in the report. It is said that strong pressure is being brought to bear on Commissioner Ryder to retire from the police superintendency gracefully, accepting the headship of another department...According to the story generally current, Ryder has been told plainly that he has lost the confidence of the public, no matter whether through his own fault or his misfortune, and that his further incombency of the police superintendency is a source of trouble to the entire commission..."

-- ------------------------------------------
17 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald, editorial
INCOMPETENT OR UNFIT
The statements made by the police authorities, from Superintendent Ryder on down the list, regarding the tragedy in the notorious Hazel McVey bawdy house, insult the intelligence of the people of Omaha. they deny everything. "the affair proves nothing." They insolently invite the newspapers to do the work that they themselves are paid to do and sworn to do. "The less said about it the better."
"I'll have you understand," says Commissioner and Police superintendent Ryder, "that neither Tom Dennison, the city council, nor anyone else will tell me how to run this department. That is my business."
The defiance of Tom Dennison, should there be any substance to it, Mr. Dennison will doubtless deal with himself. He has proved abundantly able, heretofore, to protect his own rights. But the defiance of the city council, of which Mr. Ryder is only one member, is another matter. And the defiance of the people of Omaha is likewise another matter.
Ryder has a right to defy Tom Dennison - if he wants to. If this defiance were in absolute good faith it would be unnecessary, we trust, for him to defy also, and in the same breath, the city government of Omaha and the people who are back of that government. "that is my business," says Ryder, insolently. So it is. Why does he not, then, attend to it?
If he is telling the truth when he declares that he knew nothing of this and other similar places running wide open in defiance of law, then he is clearly incompetent to be head of the police department. These places have been notorious. They have made no effort at concealment. There has been no necessity for it. If Superintendent Ryder and his police did not know of them they are the only people in the city who did not - and they are the very people who are paid to know of them, to close them, and to keep them closed.
If Ryder is not telling the truth then he is even more clearly unfit to be head of the police department. With a man either incompetent or unfit as superintendent of police the reponsibility shifts. It becomes, first, a responsibility of the city council. And it becomes, finally, a responsibility of the people of Omaha.
It is not alone "my business", though Ryder says it is. It is the council's business - for the council has assigned him to his station. And it is the people's business - for they have elected him, and have the power to recall him if he is either incompetent or unfaithful.
The scandal, the shame of it all, smells to heaven. There is the shame of the dead. There is the shame of those in charge of the police department. There is the shame of other officers of the law, including the sheriff, with power to enforce the law, sworn to enforce it, whose zeal has cooled off and whose fidelity has lagged. There is the shame of an entire city that tolerates conditions under which protected vice flourishes and protected crime defies the law even as Ryder defies the people.
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18 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald
Developments came thick and fast last night in the investigation of the murder of Henry E. Nickell in a protected house of vice, and culminated when John J. Ryder, police commissioner, had to be restrained from a personal attack on a newspaper man during a tiade against outsiders who butted into department affairs. shouting at the top of his voice that he didn't care a continental tinker's damn about anybody in Omaha, and that he wasn't afraid of the biggest man that walks in shoe leather, the commissioner shook his fist in the reporter's face and yelled that he was a liar if he even intimated that the murder inquisition was a star chamber affair...

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19 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald editorial
BY THE COUNCIL -- OR BY THE PEOPLE?
Commissioner Ryder acting, we have no doubt, on the advice of very clever and deeply interested friends, has passed the buck. He has declared, in a statement appearing in his newspaper organ, the Omaha Bee, that he is willing to turn over the police department to any other commissioner the council will select. It is in a letter weakly belligerent and loudly sobful, reeking with maudlin eloquence and fake piety, that he transfers to the shoulders of his fellow commissioners the full responsibility for his own incompetence and unfitness and the full burden of opprobrium that must attach to his further continuance in his present position.
Ryder has stepped from under. The question of what to do is now squarely up to the other six commissioners. "I never wanted this job anyhow," cries Ryder. "You forced it on me. You deliberately made me the official kicking post of this administration. If you're not satisfied with the way I'm running things I'm ready to quit. If you have some one you think can do better, put him in. I shan't stand in the way. I wash my hands of the whole trouble. You should worry!"
It is possible that Ryder takes this audacious position believing, with his advisers, that the commission will not dare call his bluff. It is possible he does it believing that his six fellow commissioners will consent to take on their own shoulders the burden of his unfitness, unpopularity, and carry it in addition to their own burdens of various sorts.
But this newspaper cannot see how the commissioners can dare do anything else than call that bluff -- if it be a bluff. they are already tainted with their full share of the odium that attaches to Ryder's administration of the police department. They put him where he is. They have the power to take him away. And he is pleading with them to do it! They know his glaring lack of qualification for the place. They know the sentiment of the city toward him. They know his habits, his associations, his natural bent. They know what his continued administration of the affairs of the department -- especially with the absurd agreement that all other commissioners must keep "hands off" -- is certain to mean during the next year. If, knowing all this, they continue him in his place, after he has invited them to relieve him, the consequences will be on their heads rather than on his...
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20 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald
The city commission determined yesterday to make Commissioner A.C. Kugel superintendent of the department of police, health and sanitation. Commissioner John J. Ryder, present head of the police department, will succeed Kugel as superintendent of street cleaning and maintenance, continuing also in charge of the public library. The transfer -- the direct outcome of the breakdown of Commissioner Ryder's administration, culminating in the Nickell-McVey tragedy Thursday night -- was determined by a vote of 4 to 2 in an executive session of the 7 commissioners, Ryder not voting...Commissioner Kugel protested vigorously against being given the herculean task of a police reorganization...Commissioner Ryder did not resign from the police superintendency. He stood pat upon his statement of Saturday, that "If anyone else wants my place, he can have it." He told the other commissioners that he was perfectly willing to be transferred if they deemed it best..."

20 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald
When, under the commission form, the superintendency of the police department passed into the hands of John J. Ryder, this newspaper was not without hope that some measure of reform would result. Mr. Ryder was a man of education, of intelligence, of newspaper training, and his standing as a man and a citizen was not unpromising. The World-Herald pleaded for "a square deal" for him, and stood ready not only to accord him a square deal but vigorously to uphold his hands to the full extent that he deserved it. He did not long deserve it. It developed that he had not the civic ideals, the will power, the strong character, the courageous independence, to enable him to cope with the public enemies who soon had his administration of police affairs enmeshed. His undoing has followed in the natural course of events.

20 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald, excerpt from a letter to the editor
I have been reading the accounts, both actual and imaginary, that have appeared in the different newspapers in regard to the murder of young Nickell and the robbery of the women and visitors in the dive run by one Hazel McVey...wherein every newspaper, even his personal organ, the Bee, attempts to hold Mr. Ryder alone responsible for this wave of crime and the non-enforcement of the 8 o'clock closing and the Albert laws, which every school boy and girl knows is being violated every day and night in Omaha and Douglas county. Why make Ryder the goat? Are there not six other commissioners who, in their campaign along with Ryder styled and branded themselves "The Square Seven"?...I am not trying to shift the blame from Ryder, who I do not think has from the day of taking office made the least attempt at law enforcement. He says himself he is not in sympathy with it. But our county officials, both sheriff and attorney, took the oath to enforce not one but all the laws on the statute books. How well they have carried out their pledges and oaths I leave the voters to decide...

24 Jan 1914, The Logan Republican, Logan, Utah
Omaha, Neb., Jan. 20 -- The commissioners of the city in executive session today voted to remove John J. Ryder from the position of superintendent of police and sanitation and to place in that position Commissioner A.L. Kugel who has been in charge of street improvements. Commissioner Ryder will be given the commission heretofore held by Kugel. The change follows charges of protected vice and the murder last Thursday night of a bank teller in a resort.

29 Jan 1914, Omaha World Herald, excerpt from a letter to the editor
...If Commissioner Kugel fails to make good, we shall set our moral police upon him and denounce him, as we have denounced John Ryder, as corrupt, abominable, the protector of vice for a consideration, for graft, whether we have proof of our charges or not...

29 Jan 1914, Lincoln Daily News
A Change in Ideas
Commissioner Jack Ryder relinquished the job of being the real chief of police of Omaha without any regret. Under his administration, if we are to accept the testimony of the Commercial club and other civic bodies, vice was given a fairly free rein. Whenever the newspapers or individuals protested public announcement was made that the police knew of no such reports as had been asserted existed. The truth was that Ryder belongs to the passing era in municipal government, more especially that which has to do with vicious conditions. The resolutions passed by the Commercial club indicate the change in sentiment. It has not been so many years ago that the business interests of Omaha were to be found lined up with the liberal element. The theory frankly advanced was that the interests of trade demanded that visitors to the city be given ample opportunity to enjoy themselves in the way that city men think men from the country desire to disport themselves when they come to a big town. Apparently it has been discovered that the presence of opportunities for visitors to kick off the bedclothes of conventionality has been embraced by the younger generation of city residents to their moral and financial disadvantage, and that some of the female recruits of the disorderly places have been taken from Omaha homes to the sorrow and shame of good people. Furnishing the supply and most of the demand does not aid in building up a city.

1 Feb 1914, Omaha World Herald
John J. Ryder, whose time as police commissioner expired at midnight last night, wound up his connection with the department by sending officdrs into every place in the city where it was even suspected that any sort of law violation was being tolerated...The movements of the policemen were kept mighty secret...As a result of the police activity half a hundred women who frequent the streets and certain tenderloin resorts in the Third ward, have left the city. Others remain, but the officers are of the opinion they will leave before any further arrests are made. The Henshaw hotel, the Rome hotel, Wrothe's cafe, the Mandarin cafe and a dozen other places were visited. All of the lower Douglas street chop suey restaurants were inspected and some of them were raided. At the Rome hotel the officers found anumber of men and women in the vineyard. There were heavy frosted glasses on tables before them. The contents of the glasses didn't look good to the officers, and so the head waiter was put under arrest and sent to the station...

2 Feb 1914, Lincoln Daily News
(Unfortunately, much of this article is illegible)
Ryder Terminates Job by Clamping Lid Tight in Omaha
Omaha, Neb., Feb 2 -- With an order to arrest the keeper of every place in Omaha where liquor is sold illegally, and to rid the town of all known immoral women, Commissioner John J. Ryder terminated his administration of the police department Saturday. Within half an hour after the drastic order had been issued and (???) frequented by women of soiled (???) and where drinks are sold (???) exercise extreme caution in conducting their business.
(???????????????????????????????????) color. When the Henshaw was visited, Thomas J. O'Brien, the proprietor, was taken. Three men drinking beer served in teacups were not molested, except to lose their drink, which was brought to the station for evidence. At the Rome hotel, "Scotty," the headwaiter, was arrested when the sergeants were unable to find anyone else in authority there. Later, W.B. Miller came to headquarters to get "Scotty" out, and was himself arrested.
The Chinese managers of the Mandarin cafe at 1416 Douglas street were arrested early in the evening and the "Canton" across the street was raided twice, the proprietor being caught selling liquor both times.
Somebody "tipped off" Wroth's cafe on Farnam street the officers say, because when they arrived, grape juice, water and coffee were the popular drinks, and the proprietor's face was adorned with a smile that stretche from ear to ear. "We never sell anything after hours," he purred to the sergeant in charge of the searching party. "No, I know you don't sell anything," emphasized the officer. "You don't sell carbolic acid or lawn mowers, do you now?"
By the time the sergeants had been out for half an hour, they found themselves followed by several hundred persons eager to see some excitement. When the officers went into the King Joy cafe on Farnam, near Fifteenth, and left through a rear door upon not finding any cause for a raid, an immense and ever augmenting crowd was left standing gaping on Farnam street, wondering what was keeping the officers in the cafe so long.

2 Feb 1914, Omaha World Herald
Commissioners Ryder and Kugel were busy this morning arranging the details of their personal office work. Commissioner Ryder's first official act as superintendent of the department of street cleaning and maintenance was the summoning of Purchasing Agent Richard Grotte for instructions as to new office furniture...

3 Feb 1914, Omaha World Herald
Despite his assumption of the prosaic duties of street cleaning and maintenance superintendent, City Commissioner Ryder continues to excite the admiration of his colleagues by his taste in office furniture. Commissioner Kugel, whom Mr. Ryder succeeded Monday morning, had been conducting the affairs of the department over a flat-top desk of uncertain age and worn appearance. No carpet or matting graced the ugly floor and even the chair used by the commissioner was squeaky and worn. Mr. Ryder ordered a carpet, new desks, bookcases, chairs and curtains immediately and when they were installed this morning they aroused the admiration of all comers. The principal piece, a handsome quarter-sawed oak double desk, for the joing use of Mr. Ryder and his stenographer, was installed in the private office, Mr. Kugel's desk being moved out for the use of the outer office clerks.

4 Feb 1914, Omaha World Herald
Mr. Ryder said yesterday that he hoped to get a new automobile, a light roadster, for his use as head of the street department. The machine used by Mr. Kugel makes too much noise and is too heavy a machine, he said. If possible it will be used elsewhere, or sold.

26 Feb 1914, Omaha World Herald
A new automobile, an additional private telephone and new clerks are conveniences which will shortly be added to the office of the superintendent of street cleaning and maintenance, Commissioner Ryder having obtained the assent of the council to the necessary resolutions this morning. Resolution No. 1 authorizes Purchasing Agent Grotte and Mr. Ryder to trade the Locomobile touring car, used by Commissioner Kugel prior to his exchange of offices with Mr. Ryder, for a new or second-hand runabout "on the best terms obtainable". The car purchased by Mr. Kugel a year and a half ago, is too noisy and too much of a rattle-trap for the personal use of Commissioner Ryder. Resolution No. 2 instructs the installation of a private telephone in Commissioner Ryder's office, with direct connection with the city central, the only telephone now in the office being connected with the city hall exchange...

27 Feb 1914, The Day Book, Chicago
Outside news from wire and cable
St. Paul -- Michael Ryder, 45, hack driver, brother of Commissioner of Public Safety John Ryder, Omaha, found dead in lodging house. Gas turned on.

27 Feb 1914, Omaha World Herald
City Commissioner Ryder left last night for St. Paul, Minn., called there by a telegram announcing the sudden death of his only brother. Mr. Ryder will remain in Minnesota until after the funeral.

28 Feb 1914, Evening Times
John J. Ryder, city commissioner of Omaha, Neb., and formerly a resident of East Grand Forks, is in St. Paul arranging for the funeral of his brother, Michael Ryder, who was suffocated by illuminating gas Wednesday night in a St. Paul rooming house.
John J. Ryder formerly was engaged in the newspaper business in this city, and is well known to local residents. After leaving East Grand Forks he engaged in newspaper work in St. Paul and a short time later entered the same field in Omaha.
Michael Ryder was 46 years old. He had been a tailor, but up to a short time ago was engaged in the livery business. He was a resident of St. Paul for about thirty years. In addition to the brothers, he is survived by two sisters, Mrs. William Daggett, widow of former Deputy United States Marshal Daggett, and Mrs. John DeWitt of Council Bluffs, Iowa.

22 Mar 1914, Omaha World Herald
If other city commissioners assent to a proposal by City Commissioner Ryder, the ambition of both Mr. Ryder and the city dog catcher to ride about town in new automobiles may be realized. Commissioner Ryder doesn't like the automobile allotted to his use, as head of the street cleaning department. It is a machine formerly used by Commissioner Kugel, prior to the transfer of the two officials. Mr. Ryder wants in its place a small runabout, which will make less noise and which will have better springs. Likewise, the city dog catcher wants an automobile. Mr. Ryder suggested to Commissioner Kugel today that the street cleaning car be built over and given to the dog catcher. Then Ryder can have a new automobile and the city won't be out the price of two machines.

25 Mar 1914, Omaha World Herald
Only one bid was received by the city council Tuesday for an automobile to be used by the city dog catcher. It was for a runabout to cost $524. Commissioner Kugel, head of the public safety department, may arrange to use an old machine of the public works department and avoid the purchase of a new machine. The machine is not now in use, but may do for the dog catcher. Commissioner Kugel will not take Commissioner Ryder's automobile of $140 as Ryder wants. The car is so heavy that the upkeep would be excessive for dog catching purposes, Kugel says. Ryder wants to get rid of the old car so that he can buy a new one for his personal use.

7 Apr 1914, Omaha World Herald
City commissioners are about to divert their attention from automobile purchases and buy dictionaries instead. It all started with Commissioner Ryder's elaborate resolutions and speeches. With perfect ease he enunciated words that had the rest of the commissioners stricken dumb with awe and lack of understanding. Commissioner Hummel stepped into the breach to save the dignity of his colleagues. He uncovered a Webster unabridged and began at the beginning, keeping the book locked in the vault between study hours, for fear that Butler, who also has ambitions, would swipe it. So far, he has only gone part way through the "As," but he was moved this morning to these remarks:
"The abracadabra of this man Ryder gives me acroparalysis. Now, my own vocabulary is accrescent and, with some few further additaments, I know I can meat this abacist, Butler, at this talking business and in time I hope to accroach to myself some of the points of dignity of Ryder."

14 Apr 1914, Omaha World Herald
A baby girl was born yesterday to Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Erhard, and everybody concerned is reported as doing finely. Mrs. Erhard is a daughter of Commissioner Jack Ryder, which makes the head of the street department a real grandfather.

30 Apr 1914, Omaha World Herald
Omaha citizens may think that they are enjoying the commission form of municipal government, but they ar sadly mistaken, according to City commissioner John J. Ryder. In an address before the Vinton Street Boosters's club, Mr. Ryder cited his own transfer from the police superintendency to the street commissionership as evidence of the fact that Omaha's pretended commission government is nothing of the sort. Such a government includes individual responsibility by each commissioner and friendly teamwork among all, Mr. Ryder asserted, neither of which exists, he said, in the Omaha city commission.
Mr. Ryder told the boosters' club that he was elected a city commissioner upon a "liberal platform." He presumed that the triumph of the liberal ticket meant that Omaha wanted to be run in a metropolitan manner, after the fashion of Denver, Kansas City, Des Moines and other cities. Being elected on such a platform, he took pride in the fact that he was "man enough to stick by his platform and run things as he had said he would do, if elected."
The Ryder administration of the police department got along all right, Mr. Ryder said, until certain city commissioners began to criticise it, covertly and openly. This exhibition of poor fellowship was diametrically opposed to the spirit of the commission form of government, Mr. Ryder told the club, since each commissioner should be left to run his own department in his own way. The climax came when Mr. Ryder was removed from the police superintendency and assigned to the street commissionership, this act proving beyond all doubt that the commission form of government in Omaha is a mere delusion and a snare, he said. Mr. Ryder criticised the Albert law and objected to enforcement of the law against social vice, when no reformatory exists as a refuge for the women concerned.

12 May 1914, Omaha World Herald
City Commissioner John J. Ryder is a grandpa now. A boy was born Sunday to his daughter, Mrs. Robert Erhard.




 
Ryder, John J. (I1025)
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2156)
 
14 (May 8, 1920 - October 18, 2013)
Chase, Douglas Stanley, West Pugwash. It is with great sadness the family of Douglas Stanley Chase, age 93, announce his passing on Friday, October 18, 2013 at the Cumberland Regional Health Care Centre, Upper Nappan. Born in Pugwash, he was the only child of the late Stanley and Gladys (Allen) Chase. He worked as a carpenter for most of his life. Doug was an avid hunter and fisherman. He will be sadly missed by his wife of 70 years, Jean (Estrabrooks) Chase; three sons, Douglas (Elinor), Sherman and Brian, all of Pugwash; a daughter, Linda (Ernie) Stewart, Amherst; grandchildren, Pamela Chase-Mobus, Jeffrey and Kevin Chase; great-grandchild, Ali Mobus. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by an infant daughter. Visitation will be held from 7-9 pm Tuesday, October 22, in Mundle's Funeral Home, 204 Water St., Pugwash (243-2506), from where the funeral service will be held at 2 pm Wednesday, October 23. Reverend David Young officiating with burial in the Palmerston Cemetery, Pugwash. Doug's family would like to express their thanks to the doctors and nurses at the North Cumberland Memorial Hospital and the Cumberland Regional Health Care Centre for their kindness and support during a very difficult time. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions in Doug's memory may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia or the charity on your choice. Private condolences may be sent to the family by visiting the funeral home website at www.mmcfunerals.com
 
Chase, Douglas Stanley (I3973)
 
15 (The Frank) Donnelly Law Office staff was reasonable stable in terms of tenure. Betty Etue was the champion, arriving from secretarial school October 28, 1953 (at age 18) (which may have been opening night for Agatha Christie's long-running London, England play ?The Mouse Trap? - I used to compare Betty's durability to that production) and retiring at age 65 in the summer of 2000 (47 years of service), through which she worked for three generations of Donnellys, Frank, Jim and Mike. Betty developed her own clientele and with minimal direction provided very well for them. Tony Bedard, Office Manager, Accountant and Law Clerk arrived in the summer of 1962 and remained rendering exemplary service until his untimely death in the summer of 2000. Betty Etue died shortly thereafter (November 17, 2000)
Ref: Donnelly On Law, Vol III by The Honourable James M. Donnelly  
Etue, OVSA 25 yrs, Elizabeth Marie (Betty) (I1402)
 
16 **** these notes from Patricia Crowder Yaw show that
our William likely does not come from Bartholemew and Elizabeth
(mel may/07)
" ID: I08011
" Name: William Crowder
" Sex: M
" Birth: 1730 in in Virginia, USA
" Death: ABT 9 FEB 1779 in Canada
" Note:
Source: Patricia Yaw
There are records of proof for William Crowder c1730 as he left the VA Colony June 19, 1746 in the company of Captain Beverly Robinson on an expedition to New York and Canada. On Feb. 9, 1779 William Crowder c1730 was listed as a casualty and did in fact die as his (widow) Hanna Rous, was listed as such in 1786 Lake Twp now Lancaster County Canada along with 5 sons, Anthony, James, Isaac, William Jr. and John when they received land grants for their service in the Military. Records are also connecting Anthony Crowder c1730 and his wife Catherine Parrelman to William Crowder in New York and Canada. I am a CROWDER researcher travelling to VA and surrounding States including Canada in the years 2000 to 2003 following the migrations of our early pioneers. If you would please post these records on your site to help our early researchers.
William Crowder c1730 died in 1779, his death has been verified on record with the Butlers Rangers. Hannah Crowder (widow) on record, verified in Canada on land grant.
William Crowder c1730 did not travel North with a brother. The records prove on June 19, 1746, William Crowder traveled North in the Company of Captain Beverly Robertson from the Virginia Colony to join Commander and Chief General George Clinton at the Province of New York for an expedition to Canada.
By Patricia Crowder Yaw.




 
Crowder (Senior), William (I3802)
 
17 **********************

This is the last Will and Testament of me Kassimir Wild of Stanley in the County of Huron and Province of Ontario made this 23rd day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and one (1901).

I revoke all former wills or testamentary depositions by me at any time heretofore made, and declare this only to be and contain my last will and testament.

I direct all my just debts, funeral and testamentary expenses to be paid and satisfied by my executors hereinafter named as soon as conveniently may be after my decease.

I give devise and bequeath all my real and personal estate of which I may die possessed in the manner following, that is to say:

To my daughter Ellen Campbell wife of George Campbell of the Township of Stanley in the County of Huron three hundred dollars ($300).

To my daughter Catherine Weir, wife of George Weir of Cavalier County in the State of North Dakota three hundred dollars ($300).

To my grand daughter Ursula Swarts daughter of Alwin Swarts of the City of Buffalo in the State of New York three hundred dollars ($300).

To my daughter Margaret of the Township of Stanley in the County of Huron the residue of my estate both real and personal for her sole use and benefit.

The legacies to my daughters Ellen Campbell and Catherine Weir I wish to be paid as soon as may be after my decease.

The legacy to my grand daughter Ursula Swarts I make payable on her attaining the full age of twenty one years.

And I nominate and appoint my daughter Margaret Wild and my son-in-law George Campbell both of Stanley to be executors of this my last will and testament.

*********************************

(ed. note) Casimir's will reflects a simple logic:
- Sons John and Peter had moved to North Dakota over 20 years earlier and were successful and well established farmers by the time Casimir died. Peter is known to have arrived in North Dakota in 1880 equipped with horses, a wagon and assorted supplies with a total value of about $230. It is likely that John came similarly equipped. They both had effectively claimed their patrimony years ago.
- Son William had died, leaving no heir. Daughter Annie had died, leaving an heir Ursula Swarts.
- Daughters Catherine and Ellen (Helena) and grand daughter Ursula each received equal cash bequests of $300.
- All else, including the house and property, was bequeathed to the youngest daughter, 34 year old Margaret (Maggie), a "spinster".

When Casimir died in 1904, all of his children were married and established in their own homes -- except for his youngest daughter, 34 year old Maggie who had cared for Casimir and Catherine in their later years. When Maggie was 39, she married Frank Keegan and they continued to live in the old Casimir Wild house. Twenty years later in 1929, Maggie died of a "cerebral abscess". She was remembered in her obituary as "an industrious woman, a good wife and a kind neighbor". Frank Keegan died in 1952. Maggie and Frank didn't have any children, so they bequeathed the old Casimir Wild property to an orphanage. The home is now privately owned, no longer in the Wild family. It is in excellent repair. 
Wild, Casimir Sebastian (I103)
 
18 037337-26 Richard Edward ETUE, 26, Street Car Conductor, born Drysdale - Huron Co., living in Detroit, s/o Richard Edward ETUE & Anna BRISSON married Anna Marie CAREY, 24, of McGillvray Township, Mount Carmel, d/o James CAREY & Theresa McCARTHY. Witnesses: Joseph CAREY of RR#8 Parkhill & Amy ETUE of RR#2 Zurich, on 14 July 1926 at Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.
 
Etue, Richard Edward (I2008)
 
19 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2705)
 
20 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F320
 
21 1 Mar 1900, Clinton News Record
Seldom does death's call cast a greater gloom over a neighborhood than that which was cast over our village Tueday afternoon on hearing that Mr. Joseph Wild, one of the oldest and best known citizens of Stanley township had breathed his last breath at the ripe age of seventy-four years, after several weeks of illness produced by stomach trouble. The deceased, although comparatively speaking an old man, having passed the allotted span of life, was until very recently full of life and vigor, actively engaged in the pursuits of life and giving promise of life being prolonged many years yet. But fate would have it otherwise, and today Bayfield and vicinity has one useful, genial, hospitable citizen less and the Stanley Agricultural Society has lost one of its most active and energetic members. The deceased was a German by birth, a Roman Catholic in religion and a staunch Reformer in politics. He was twice married and leaves a large family of grown-up boys and girls and a faithful wife to mourn the demise of a kind and indulgent father and husband who will be sadly missed not only by his mourning relatives but also by a wide circle of friends who will remember long his kindly greeting and genial companionship.The deceased was in comfortable circumstances and leaves his family well provided for. The funeral will take place Friday morning, March 2nd,1900, at 9 o'clock, the interment taking place in the St Peter's R.C. cemetery between Drysdale and St.Joseph, Ontario.

2 Mar 1900, The Clinton New Era. We are sorry to learn of the death of Joseph Wild, who, after a short illness, passed away at the advanced age of seventy-four years. Mr. Wild emigrated from Waterloo, Ont., and was one of the pioneers of this place. He was a good friend to all, and a prominent member of the Stanley branch Agricultural society. He was also elected councillor for this place for several years.

8 Mar 1900, Goderich Signal Star. An old and respected resident passed away on Tuesday of last week in the person of Joseph Wild at the age of 74 years and 8 months. The deceased was of German descent, a reformer in politics and well liked by all who knew him. Of his family of thirteen children a number who reside in the States, some of whom were over for the funeral, which took place on Friday. 
Wild, (John) Joseph (I107)
 
22 1. DAVID1 VANCE, Sr., b. 174_ in Northern Ireland,1 d. Mar-Sep 1804 in Great Village, Colchester, NS, Can,2 buried in Great Village, Colchester, NS, Can (perhaps in the same burying ground as his son Patrick ), resided in Great Village, Colchester, NS, Can,3 occupation Farmer.
2 He married ISABELLA (unk), 176_ in Northern Ireland, b.
174_ in Northern Ireland,1 d. 01 Jun 1808 in Great Village, Colchester, NS, Can (she is mentioned as still living in the Will of her grandson Robert Vance Davidson of that date), buried in Great Village, Colchester, NS, Can.
 
Vance Sr, David (I3576)
 
23 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2155)
 
24 1033 Alta Mesa Drive, Moraga, California, USA. Family F530
 
25 11 Apr 1907
Diocesis Aboensis, Magni Princ Finl
Worker Johan Edvard Baddar, of Afremalaks village, born 20 Dec 1884 in Malaks

11 May 1907
Ellis Island
Edvard Baddar, 22 years old, single, from Malaks, Finland. Height 5 foot 10 inches, light complexion, light hair, blue eyes. Arrived on the Campania. Occupation laborer. Had a ticket to Daggett, Michigan where he planned to join his friend Isak Stone. Also had $20.

(ed note: Most of the travelers who appeared in this record with Edvard Baddar only had $10. None had more than $40.)

1910 US census, Escanaba, Michigan
Household including a husband, wife, two sons, one 20 year old female servant, and 15 male boarders, mostly in their 20s, all household members Swede Finns. Both sons and all but one boarder work as laborers, mostly on the iron ore dock. The remaining boarder is a deliveryman for a grocery store. One of the boarders is Ed Matson, 25 years old, single, arrived in the US in 1907, not a citizen, speaks English, occupation laborer for the railroad.

1911 Escanaba city directory
Edward Mattson, lab, bds 807 Escanaba av
Fred Mattson, lab, bds 807 Escanaba av

1913 Escanaba city directory
Edward Mattson, wife Anna, laborer, 807 Escanaba av
Frederick, sec hd, bds 807 Escanaba av
(ed note: This entry is particularly interesting. It is almost certainly my grandfather Ed and his brother Fred. My grandfather did not marry my grandmother until 1926, and I am not aware of any previous wives. However, he was 42 years old when he married my grandmother, so a previous wife would not be that surprising. Another possibility is that "Anna" is Marie Anne Bolin, who married Fred Mattson in 1920.)

1917-1918 World War I Draft Registration Card
Edward Mattson, 1007 Esc Ave, Escanaba, Delta, Michigan. Born 20 Dec 1884 in Finland. Occupation Laborer on dock, working for C&M & St. Paul. Height tall (from tall, medium, short). Build medium (from slender, medium, stout). Blue eyes, brown hair. Nearest relative Fred Mattson, 913 Esc Ave, Escanaba, Michigan.

22 May 1926 Marriage certificate
J. Edward Mattson, 41 years old, residence Gardner, Mass., occupation Stovemaker, born in Finland. First marriage. Father Mattias Mattson. Mother Ulla B. Stalpe. Bride Amanda (Strom) Strom, 42 years old, residence Gardner, Mass., occupation Housework, born in Finland. Second marriage (widowed). Father Erick Strom. Mother Maria Gastgiver.

1927 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Edward Mattson, 87 Church Street

1928 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Edward Mattson, 87 Church Street

1929 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Edward Mattson, 87 Church Street

1930 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Edward Mattson, 87 Church Street

1930 US census, Gardner, Massachusetts
Household headed by Edward Mattson, owner of home, home value $2000, 44 years old, 41 years old at time of first marriage, able to read and write, born in Finland, parents born in Finland, mother tongue Swedish, immigrated in 1907, not a citizen, able to speak English, occupation laborer. Wife Amanda Mattson, 46 years old, 19 years old at time of first marriage, born in Finland, both parents born in Finland, mother tongue Swedish, immigrated in 1907, not a citizen, able to speak English, occupation none. Son Melvin E. Mattson, 3 years old, born in Massachusetts, both parents born in Finland. Stepdaughter Ellen Strom, 15 years old, born in Massachusetts, both parents born in Finland, in school. Stepson Oren Strom, 14 years old, born in Massachusetts, both parents born in Finland, in school.

6 Oct 1936, Declaration of Intention, Naturalization records, New York
John Edward Mattson, 2160 Webster Ave, Bronx; occupation laborer; 51 years old; fair complexion; blue eyes, race Swedish; nationality Finnish; born in Malax, Finland on 20 Dec 1884. Wife Amanda; married 22 May 1936 at Gardner, Mass.; wife born in Malax, Finland on 16 Dec 1883. Three children: Melvin 8/6/26; Ellen 4/16/14; Isak 9/11/1915. Last foreign residence was Malax, Finland. Emigrated to the US from Liverpool to New York under the name Edward Baddar on 11 May 1907 on the SS Campania.

12 Jul 1939, Petition for Naturalization, New York
John Edward Mattson, formerly Edvard Baddar, born in Malax, Finland 20 Dec 1884. Residence 2160 Webster Ave, Bronx, NY. Have resided in New York since 30 Jun 1931. Entered the US 11 May 1907 on the Campania from Liverpool, England. Married to Amanda 22 May 1926 in Gardner, Mass. Wife born in Malax, Finland, December 16, 1883, entered New York September 5, 1910. Son Melvin, born 6 Aug 1926, born in Gardner, Mass., resides at Bronx, NY.

20 November 1939, Petition for Naturalization, New York
John Edward Mattson, 2160 Webster Ave, Bronx, NY. Age 54 years.

1940 US Census, Bronx, New York
Household headed by Edward Mattson; 55 years old; 6th grade education; born in Finland; occupation porter at an apartment house; worked 48 hours during the week of March 24-30, 1940; annual income $1100; renter; monthly rent $25. Wife Manda Mattson, 56 years old; 5th grade education; born in Finland; occupation housework. Son Melvin Mattson, 13 years old, 8th grade education, born in Massachusetts. Step daughter Ellen Strom; 25 years old; single; completed high school; born in Massachusetts; occupation hairdresser at a beauty shop; worked 48 hours during the week of March 24-30, 1940; worked 26 weeks during 1939; annual income $400.

1942 World War II draft registration card
John Edward Mattson, 2160 Webster Ave, Bronx. 57 years old, born 20 Dec 1884 in Finland. Employed by Bing & Bing Co (Main Office), 302 W 12th St (Porter), New York, New York. Wife Amanda Mattson. Race white, height 5'11", weight 163 pounds, blue eyes, brown hair, light complexion, wears glasses.

(ed. note: Bing & Bing was an important apartment real estate developer in NYC in the early 20th century. They built for the luxury market, and their buildings are regarded by many as among NYC's finest prewar properties.)

New York Death Index
Edward Mattson, age 62, born about 1885, died 13 Aug 1947 in Bronx, New York, USA

Social Security applications and claims index
John Edward Mattson, born 20 Dec 1884, died 13 Aug 1947, born in the United Kingdom
(ed note: "United Kingdom" is clearly a clerical error. A good example of the challenges facing genealogy nerds.) 
Mattson, John Edward (I20)
 
26 11 Aug 1893-5 Apr 1927 Holy Sepulchre, Southfield, Oakland County, Michigan, USA ? Denomy, Daniel (I4581)
 
27 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2177)
 
28 14 Jan 1986
Leone G. Marquart

The funeral for Leone G. Marquart, 68, 1102 18th St. S., Moorhead, will be here at 11:30 Thursday in St. Joseph Catholic Church, with a prayer service at 8 p.m. Wednesday in Korsmo chapel. She died Monday.

Leone G. Hoefling was born Aug. 5, 1917, at Fargo. She grew up at Georgetown, and attended school in Moorhead. She married E.F. (Gene) Marquart Nov. 28, 1935, at Georgetown. They lived at Georgetown, Glyndon, Minn., West Fargo, and Mapleton, N.D. In 1962, they moved to Moorhead. In 1970, they moved to Fargo, returning to Moorhead in 1975. She had worked for the North Dakota State University Food Service and the Moorhead State University Food Service. He died in 1980. She retired in 1983.

She is survived by five sons and a daughter, Gregory, 806 S. University Drive, Fargo; Eugene, 1122 3rd St. S., and John, 1509 8th St. S., both Moorhead; Paul, 605 1st St. N.E., Dilworth; Douglas, Glyndon; and Mrs. Gregory (Linda) Butler, Bismarck, N.D.; her mother, Ethel Hoefling, Moorhead Manor, Moorhead; a sister, Mrs. Leslie (Jeane) Tiedeman, Leavenworth, Wash.; 18 grandchildren and six great grandchildren. 
Hoefling, Leone (I1704)
 
29 14th Mississippi Infantry, Company C, Private, Civil War Confederate http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm
 
Maddox, Thomas A. (I1554)
 
30 15 May 1911
Passenger list for the Lapland, New York, New York included an Isaac Strom

1912 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac lab h 63 Leamy av

1914 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac janitor h 38 N Main

1915 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac janitor h 181 Park
-- Victor mach bds 181 Park

1916 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac janitor h 181 Park
-- Victor mach bds 181 Park

1917 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac janitor h 66 Leamy
-- Victor mach bds 66 Leamy

1919 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac emp CO&GSCo h 66 Leamy
-- Victor mach bds 66 Leamy

1920 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac emp CO&GSCo h 66 Leamy
-- Victor mach bds 66 Leamy

1920 US census, Gardner, Massachusetts
Household headed by Isaac Strom, renter, 55 years old, immigrated in 1911, not a citizen, able to read and write, born in Finland, mother tongue Swedish, both parents born in Finland, both parents mother tongue Swedish, able to speak English, occupation Laborer at oil stove factory. Wife Amanda, 36 years old, immigrated in 1910, not a citizen, able to read and write, born in Finland, mother tongue Swedish, both parents born in Finland, both parents mother tongue Swedish, able to speak English, occupation None. Son Victor A., 22 years old, immigrated in 1910, not a citizen, born in Finland, mother tongue Swedish, both parents born in Finland, both parents mother tongue Swedish, able to speak English, occupation Laborer at time recorder factory. Daughter Ellen E., 5 years old, born in Massachusetts, both parents born in Finland, both parents mother tongue Swedish. Son Oren I., 4 years old, born in Massachusetts, both parents born in Finland, both parents mother tongue Swedish.

1921 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac emp CO&GSCo h 66 Leamy
-- Victor mach res 66 Leamy

1922 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isak emp CO&GSCo h 71 Coleman
-- Victor emp C_KCo res 71 Coleman

1923 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isak (Amanda) emp CO&GSCo h 71 Coleman
-- Victor emp Am Fibre Co res 71 Coleman

1924 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isak (Amanda) emp CO&GSCo h 71 Coleman
-- Victor (Edith) emp H-WCo res 55 Leamy

1925 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Isaac (Amanda) emp FSCo h 87 Church
-- Victor (Edith) r 55 Leamy

19 Oct 1925, Fitchburg Sentinel, Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Rev. F.E.W. Kastman of the Finnish-Swedish Lutheran church officiated Sunday afternoon at funeral services in the church for Isaac Strom, 87 Church street. He was born in Finland in 1864 and lived in Gardner 14 years. He leaves his wife and two children, Ellen Strom and Oren Strom.

1926 city directory, Gardner, Massachusetts
Strom Amanda wid Isaac rem to Michigan 
Strom, Isak (I19)
 
31 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1118)
 
32 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F324
 
33 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2777)
 
34 1721 South Woodhaven, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA Family F535
 
35 1830: Holmes S. Daggett, Strong, Somerset Co., Maine
Head of household which included
1 male of five and under ten (note: likely Holmes Jr., born 1820)
2 males of ten and and under fifteen (note: likely William Smith, born 1816; and John Minot, born 1818)
1 male of thirty and under forty (note: likely Holmes Sr., born 1793)
1 male of forty and under fifty (note: unknown person)
1 female under five years of age (note: likely Mary Sewall, born 1824)
1 female of forty and under fifty (note: likely Mary Hartson Smith Daggett, born 1784)

 
Daggett, William Smith (I300)
 
36 1830: Holmes S. Daggett, Strong, Somerset Co., Maine
Head of household which included
1 male of five and under ten (note: likely Holmes Jr., born 1820)
2 males of ten and and under fifteen (note: likely William Smith, born 1816; and John Minot, born 1818)
1 male of thirty and under forty (note: likely Holmes Sr., born 1793)
1 male of forty and under fifty (note: unknown person)
1 female under five years of age (note: likely Mary Sewall, born 1824)
1 female of forty and under fifty (note: likely Mary Hartson Smith Daggett, born 1784)

1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Holmes S. Daggett, 57 yo, born in Edgartown, Mass, occupation Cordwainer. Mary H. Daggett, 66 yo, born in Province of N.B. John M. Daggett, 32 yo, born in Temple, Maine, occupation Seaman. Mary F. Daggett, 25 yo, born in Strong, Maine. Holmes S. Daggett, Jr., 30 yo, born in Strong, Maine, occupation Cordwainer. Sarah J. Daggett, 25 yo, born in Hartland, Maine. Mary H. Daggett, 2 yo, born in Houlton, Maine. (ed. note: Cordwainer is an old term for shoemaker) 
Smith, Mary Hartson (I160)
 
37 1830: Holmes S. Daggett, Strong, Somerset Co., Maine
Head of household which included
1 male of five and under ten (note: likely Holmes Jr., born 1820)
2 males of ten and and under fifteen (note: likely William Smith, born 1816; and John Minot, born 1818)
1 male of thirty and under forty (note: likely Holmes Sr., born 1793)
1 male of forty and under fifty (note: unknown person)
1 female under five years of age (note: likely Mary Sewall, born 1824)
1 female of forty and under fifty (note: likely Mary Hartson Smith Daggett, born 1784)

1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Holmes S. Daggett, 57 yo, born in Edgartown, Mass, occupation Cordwainer. Mary H. Daggett, 66 yo, born in Province of N.B. John M. Daggett, 32 yo, born in Temple, Maine, occupation Seaman. Mary F. Daggett, 25 yo, born in Strong, Maine. Holmes S. Daggett, Jr., 30 yo, born in Strong, Maine, occupation Cordwainer. Sarah J. Daggett, 25 yo, born in Hartland, Maine. Mary H. Daggett, 2 yo, born in Houlton, Maine. (ed. note: Cordwainer is an old term for shoemaker) 
Daggett, Holmes Stewart (I301)
 
38 1830: Holmes S. Daggett, Strong, Somerset Co., Maine
Head of household which included
1 male of five and under ten (note: likely Holmes Jr., born 1820)
2 males of ten and and under fifteen (note: likely William Smith, born 1816; and John Minot, born 1818)
1 male of thirty and under forty (note: likely Holmes Sr., born 1793)
1 male of forty and under fifty (note: unknown person)
1 female under five years of age (note: likely Mary Sewall, born 1824)
1 female of forty and under fifty (note: likely Mary Hartson Smith Daggett, born 1784)

1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Holmes S. Daggett, 57 yo, born in Edgartown, Mass, occupation Cordwainer. Mary H. Daggett, 66 yo, born in Province of N.B. John M. Daggett, 32 yo, born in Temple, Maine, occupation Seaman. Mary F. Daggett, 25 yo, born in Strong, Maine. Holmes S. Daggett, Jr., 30 yo, born in Strong, Maine, occupation Cordwainer. Sarah J. Daggett, 25 yo, born in Hartland, Maine. Mary H. Daggett, 2 yo, born in Houlton, Maine. (ed. note: Cordwainer is an old term for shoemaker) 
Daggett, Mary Sewall (I302)
 
39 1830: Sewall Cates, Monroe, Waldo County, Maine
Head of household which included:
2 males under 5 years of age
1 male of 20 and under 30
1 female of 20 and under 30

1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Solomon B. Cates, 23 yo, Cordwainer, born in Monroe, Maine
Mary N. Cates, 20 yo, born in Houlton, Maine
Rebecca Cates, 45 yo, born in Monroe, Maine
Martha M. Cates, 18 yo, born in Province of N.B.
Alfred Symonds, 26 yo, born in Province of N.B., Tanner.

1860 Maine Federal census index
Rebecca Cates, Houlton township, Aroostook County, Maine 
Bolton, Rebecca (I178)
 
40 1830: Sewall Cates, Monroe, Waldo County, Maine
Head of household which included:
2 males under 5 years of age
1 male of 20 and under 30
1 female of 20 and under 30

1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Solomon B. Cates, 23 yo, Cordwainer, born in Monroe, Maine
Mary N. Cates, 20 yo, born in Houlton, Maine
Rebecca Cates, 45 yo, born in Monroe, Maine
Martha M. Cates, 18 yo, born in Province of N.B.
Alfred Symonds, 26 yo, born in Province of N.B., Tanner.  
Cates, Solomon B. (I1431)
 
41 1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Solomon B. Cates, 23 yo, Cordwainer, born in Monroe, Maine
Mary N. Cates, 20 yo, born in Houlton, Maine
Rebecca Cates, 45 yo, born in Monroe, Maine
Martha M. Cates, 18 yo, born in Province of N.B.
Alfred Symonds, 26 yo, born in Province of N.B., Tanner.

1856 Iowa Census, Maine, Linn County, Iowa
J.M. Daggett, 37 year old male, married, born NY, in Iowa 3 years. M. M. Daggett, 22 year old female, married, born New Brunswick, in Iowa 3 years. C. Daggett, 2 year old female, born Iowa. (child Carmen).

1860 US Census, Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 43 yo, born in Maine, occupation Day Laborer. Value of personal estate $100. Matilda M. Daggett, 28 yo female, born in Maine. Carmine B, 6 yo female, born in Iowa. Harry B, 3 yo male, born in Iowa. Walter, 1 yo male, born in Iowa.

1865 Illinois Census, Dunleith
Household headed by John M. Daggett. Household includes 3 males under age 20 (Walter Scott, Harry Bertram, William Smith); 3 females age 10-20 (Carmen Belmon and 2 unknown females); 2 females age 20-30 (unknown females); 1 female age 30-40 (wife Martha); and 1 male age 40-50 (John M.)

1870 US Census, Dunleith, Jo Daviess, Illinois
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 50 yo, Justice of the Peace, born in Maine. Value of real estate $1800. Value of personal estate $2000. Matilda, 37 yo female, keeping house. Carmine, 17 yo female. Harry, 13 yo male. Willie, 7 yo male. Wallace, 1 yo male.

1880 Census, West Point Township, District 113, Butler County, Iowa
Household headed by J.M. Daggett, 62 yo, RR Station Agent at Allison, born in Maine, father born in Rhode Island, mother born in Maine. Martha M. Daggett, 47 yo female, keeping house, born in Maine, both of her parents born in Maine. William, 16 yo male, Clerk in RR Station, born in Illinois. Wallace, 11 yo male, born in Illinois.

1885 Iowa Census, Butler
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 66 years old, born in Maine, occupation "railroad". wife Martha M. Daggett, 53 years old, born Maine, occupation housewife. Wallace Daggett, 17 years old, single.

1889 St. Paul, Minnesota city directory
John M. Daggett, ins agt, res 265 W 5th
Wallace M. Daggett, clk C St P & K C Ry, bds 265 W 5th
Wm S Daggett, Dep U S Marshall, bds 265 W 5th

1890 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, ins agt, 155 E Congress
Wallace Daggett, clk C St P & K C Ry, bds 155 E Congress
Wm S Daggett, dep U S Marshall Custom House, 155 E Congress

1891 St. Paul Directory
John M. Daggett, 155 E Congress
Wallace Daggett, bds 155 E Congress
Wm S Daggett, dep U S Marshall Custom House, 155 E Congress

1893 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, res 155 E Congress
Wallace M. Daggett, clk C G W shops, bds 155 E Congress

1894 St Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, boarding house 25 E 10th
Wallace Daggett, clk C G W shops, bds 25 E 10th

1895 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, boarding 25 E 10th
Wallace Daggett, clk C G W shops, bds 25 E 10th

1895 Minnesota state census
Household at 25 E. 10th Street, St. Paul. Headed by John M. Daggett, 77 years old, born in Maine, in Minnesota for 7 years, in this district for 4 years. Mrs. Martha Daggett, 63 years old, born in Maine, occupation housewife. Household also includes Harry B. Daggett, 37 years old. Wallace M. Daggett, 26 years old, born in Iowa, occupation clerk.

1896 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, boarding 526 Cedar
Wallace M. Daggett, clk C G W shops, b 526 Cedar

1897 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, r 526 Cedar
Wallace, clk C G W shops, b 526 Cedar

1898 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, boarding 526 Cedar, r same
Wallace M. Daggett, bkpr C G W shops, b 526 Cedar

1899 St. Paul city directory
John M. Daggett, moved to Minneapolis
Wallace M. Daggett, moved to Minneapolis

1900 Minneapolis city directory
John M. Daggett, r flat 2 60 s 13th
Wallace M. Daggett, trav agt West Shore Line, b flat 2 60 s 13th

1901 Minneapolis directory
John M. Daggett, moved to Oshkosh, Wis.
Wallace M. Daggett, trav agt Red Line Transit Co, b 2757 Fremont av s

1903 Minneapolis directory
John M. Daggett, b flat 2 12 Grove
Wallace M. Daggett, trav agt Washburn-Crosby Co, r Louisville, Ky
Wm S Daggett, detective, r flat 2 12 Grove

1904 Minneapolis directory
John M. Daggett, b flat 2 12 Grove
Wallace M. Daggett, trav agt Washburn-Crosby Co, b West Hotel
Wm S Daggett, detective, r flat 2 12 Grove

1905 Minnesota Census
household at 12 Grove Street, Minneapolis
W.S. Daggett, born in Illinois, both parents born in Maine. 41 years old. Occupation: detective.
Ann Daggett, born in Canada, both parents born in Ireland. 34 years old. Occupation: housewife
Martha M. Daggett, born in Maine, both parents born in Maine. 73 years old. Retired.
Paul Daggett, 12 years old. Born in Minnesota, father born in Illinois, mother born in Canada.
Martha Daggett, 10 years old. Born in North Dakota, father born in Illinois, mother born in Canada.
Marian Daggett, 8 years old. Born in North Dakota, father born in Illinois, mother born in Canada.
Dorothy Daggett, 5 years old. Born in Minnesota, father born in Illinois, mother born in Canada.
Helen Daggett, 3 years old. Born in Minnesota, father born in Illinois, mother born in Canada.

1910 Census, 13-Wd Minneapolis, District 202, Hennepin County, Minnesota
Household headed by W.S. Daggett, 46 yo male, born in Illinois, both parents born in Maine, grain merchant. Wife Anna, 39 yo, immigrated to U.S. in 1886, mother of 5 children, all of them living. Son Paul, 17 yo, born in Minnesota. Daughter Martha, 15 yo, born in North Dakota. Daughter Marion, 12 yo, born in North Dakota. Daughter Dorothy, 9 yo, born in Minnesota. Daughter Helen, 7 yo, born in Minnesota. Mother Martha, 79 yo, married for 53 years, born in Maine, mother of 5 children, 4 of them living.

1910 Minneapolis city directory
Martha M. Daggett (wid John) b 3505 3d ave S
Wm S Daggett clk L H Cella & Co r 3505 3d av S

Certificate of Death, State of Minnesota
Martha M. Daggett, born 25 Jul 1832, passed away 15 May 1911. Father born in Maine. Occupation Hwife. Cause of death: cancer of the uterus. 
Cates, Martha Matilda (I158)
 
42 1850 Census, Aroostook, Houlton County, Maine
Household headed by Solomon B. Cates, 23 yo, Cordwainer, born in Monroe, Maine
Mary N. Cates, 20 yo, born in Houlton, Maine
Rebecca Cates, 45 yo, born in Monroe, Maine
Martha M. Cates, 18 yo, born in Province of N.B.
Alfred Symonds, 26 yo, born in Province of N.B., Tanner. 
Cates, Mary N. (I1430)
 
43 1851 Canadian Census, Ontario
Patrick Filbin, 22 years old, laborer. Bridget Filbin, 23 years old.

1860 US Census, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Patrick Filbin, 40 years old, born in Ireland, laborer, unable to read or write. Bridget Filbin, 40 years old, born in Ireland, unable to read or write. Bridget Filbin, 13 years old, born in Ireland. Mary Filbin, 7 years old, born in Canada. Kate Filbin, 5 years old, born in Wisconsin. John Filbin, 1 year old, born in Illinois.

1870 US Census, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Patrick Filburn, 39 years old, laborer, born in Ireland. Bridget, 41 years old, born in Ireland, "keeping house". Catherine, 14 years old, born in Canada. John, 12 years old, born in Illinois. James, 10 years old, born in Wisconsin. Julia, 6 years old, born in Wisconsin.

1880 US Census, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Patrick Filburn, 65 years old, born in Ireland, laborer. Wife Bridget, 55 years old, born in Ireland, "keeping house". Son James, 19 years old, born in Wisconsin, printer. Son John, 21 years old, born in Wisconsin, printer. Daughter Julia, 16 years old, born in Wisconsin.

1900 US Census, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Bridget Filbin, widowed, born June 1830, 69 years old, born in Ireland, owns house with a mortgage, unable to read or write, entered the US in 1850. Son James, single, born March 1861, 39 years old, born in Wisconsin, occupation "contractor mason". Son John, single, born June 1859, 40 years old, occupation printer. Daughter Kate Seneschall, widowed, born October 1857, 42 years old, born in Canada, occupation dressmaker. Daughter Julia, single, born June 1863, 36 years old

1905 Wisconsin Census, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Household headed by Bridget Philbin, 75 years old, born in Ireland, retired. Son James, 42 years old, born in Wisconsin, occupation "mason cou'r"(?). Son John, 44 years old, born in Illinois, occupation printer. Daughter Julia, 40 years old, born in Wisconsin, occupation "cloru"(??). Boarder Katherine Senechal, 47 years old, born in Canada, occupation dressmaker.

1910 US Census, Kenosha, Wisconsin
Household headed by Bridget Filbin, 79 years old, born "Ire. Irish", immigrated to US in 1860, occupation "own income", able to read and write. Son John J., 50 years old, born in Illinois, occupation printer. Son James F., 48 years old, born in Wisconsin, occupation contractor, working for a mason. Daughter Julia E., 46 years old, born in Wisconsin, occupation none. 
Ryder, Bridget (I2412)
 
44 1855 Griffith's Valuation
Landlord Huston Nixon, tenant Daniel Ryder, place name Camcloon Beg, Burrishoole parish, Newport, County Mayo, Ireland 
Ryder, Daniel (I1886)
 
45 1860 Census, Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 43 yo, born in Maine, occupation Day Laborer. Matilda M. Daggett, 28 yo female, born in Maine. Carmine B, 6 yo female, born in Iowa. Harry B, 3 yo, born in Iowa. Walter, 1 yo, born in Iowa.

1870 Census, Town of Dunleith, County of Jo Daviess, State of Illinois
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 50 yo, Justice of the Peace, born in Maine. Matilda, 37 yo female. Carmine, 17 yo female. Harry, 13 yo male. Willie, 7 yo male. Wallace, 1 yo male.

 
Daggett, Carmine Belmont (I304)
 
46 1860 Census, Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 43 yo, born in Maine, occupation Day Laborer. Matilda M. Daggett, 28 yo female, born in Maine. Carmine B, 6 yo female, born in Iowa. Harry B, 3 yo, born in Iowa. Walter, 1 yo, born in Iowa. 
Daggett, Walter Scott (I306)
 
47 1860 US Census, Louisville, Kentucky
Household headed by John Fox, 50 year old laborer, born in Ireland. Wife Johanna, 35 years old, born in Ireland. Daughter Ellen, 11 years old, born in Ohio.

1870 US Census, 12 Ward, City of Louisville, County of Jefferson, Kentucky
Household headed by John Rider, 40 year old laborer, born in Ireland, unable to read or write. Wife Ellen, 22 years old, born in Ireland, "keeping home", also unable to read or write. Mary, 6 years old, born in Kentucky. Martin, 3 years old, born in Kentucky. Hannah, 5 months old, born in Kentucky in January 1870.

1880 US Census, District 151, Jefferson County, Kentucky
Household headed by John Rider, 38 year old laborer, born in Ireland. Wife Ellen, 38 years old, born in Ireland, "keeping home". Daughter Mary, 16 years old, born in Kentucky, seamstress. Son Martin, 12 years old, born in Kentucky. Daughter Hannah, 10 years old, born in Kentucky. Daughter Margaret, 8 years old, born in Kentucky. Daughter Jennie, 3 years old, born in Kentucky.

17 Apr 1900 Daily Picayune obituaries
RYDER -- On Monday, April 16, 1900, at 7:15 o'clock a.m., ELLEN FOX, widow of the late John Ryder, a native of Louisville, Ky., aged 50 years.
The friends and acquaintances of the family and those of her sons, Martin and John Ryder, also her sons-in-law, John Haas and Peter Jobe, are respectfully invited to attend the funeral, which will take place This (Tuesday) Afternoon at 3 o'clock, from the family residence, No. 804 Eighth street.
Louisville, Ky., papers please copy.
 
Fox, Ellen (I2502)
 
48 1865 Illinois Census, Dunleith
Household headed by John M. Daggett. Household includes 3 males under age 20 (Walter Scott, Harry Bertram, William Smith); 3 females age 10-20 (Carmen Belmon and 2 unknown females); 2 females age 20-30 (unknown females); 1 female age 30-40 (wife Martha); and 1 male age 40-50 (John M.)

1870 Census, Town of Dunleith, County of Jo Daviess, State of Illinois
Household headed by John M. Daggett, 50 yo, Justice of the Peace, born in Maine. Matilda, 37 yo female. Carmine, 17 yo female. Harry, 13 yo male. Willie, 7 yo male. Wallace, 1 yo male.

1880 Census, West Point Township, District 113, Butler County, Iowa
Household headed by J.M. Daggett, 62 yo, RR Station Agent at Allison, born in Maine, father born in Rhode Island, mother born in Maine. Martha M. Daggett, 47 yo female, keeping house, born in Maine, both of her parents born in Maine. William, 16 yo male, Clerk in RR Station, born in Illinois. Wallace, 11 yo male, born in Illinois.

*******************************
From The History of Butler and Bremer County, Iowa, page 766:

The Brass Band of Allison was organized in August, 1881, consisting of the following musicians: F.L. Dodge, leader, E flat cornet; G.L. Anderson, first B flat cornet; Henry Farnum, second B flat cornet; C.W. Lewis, first alto; Will Corwin, second alto; M. Weires, first tenor; Will Daggett, second tenor; W.E. Hyde, baritone; Ed. Lincoln, tuba; James Gillen, bass drum; Zena Thomas, snare drum...There has been but little change in the band, and its members have become very proficient in the use of their instruments.

 
Daggett, William Smith (I84)
 
49 1865 Louisville directory: John R. Rider, teamster, r ws 15th, bet Delaware and Kentucky

1866 Louisville directory: John Rider, laborer RT Scowden, r 677 High, bet 7th and 8th Cross

1867 Louisville directory: John Rider, laborer, r 677 High, between 7th and 8th Cross. Also John Ryder, potter, Lockhart and Co, r 677 High, bet 7th and 8th Cross, Portland

1869 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer Lockhart and Co, r es 6th Cross, bet Montgomery and Portland av

1870 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, 638 High, Portland

1870 US Census, 12 Ward, City of Louisville, County of Jefferson, Kentucky
Household headed by John Rider, 40 year old laborer, born in Ireland, unable to read or write. Wife Ellen, 22 years old, born in Ireland, "keeping home", also unable to read or write. Mary, 6 years old, born in Kentucky. Martin, 3 years old, born in Kentucky. Hannah, 5 months old, born in Kentucky in January 1870.

1871 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, r 638 High, bet 7th and 8th Cross

1872 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, r 637 High, nr 8th Cross

1873 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, Falls City Cement Co, r ns High, nr 17th

1874 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, r 651 High, nr 8th Cross

1875 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, r Shippingport

1876 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, r 203 Canal nr 18th

1877 Louisville directory: John Rider, laborer, r 203 Canal, S

1878 Louisville directory: John Rider, foreman Union Cement and Lime Co, r Canal nr 19th, 8

1879 Louisville directory: John Ryder, engineer Union Cement and Lime Co, r 203 Canal, S

1880 US Census, District 151, Jefferson County, Kentucky
Household headed by John Rider, 38 year old laborer, born in Ireland. Wife Ellen, 38 years old, born in Ireland, "keeping home". Daughter Mary, 16 years old, born in Kentucky, seamstress. Son Martin, 12 years old, born in Kentucky. Daughter Hannah, 10 years old, born in Kentucky. Daughter Margaret, 8 years old, born in Kentucky. Daughter Jennie, 3 years old, born in Kentucky.

1880 Louisville directory: J. Rider, laborer Lou Plate-glass Wks

1881 Louisville directory: John Ryder, laborer, r 637 High av, nr 24th

New Orleans Picayune obituaries
Ryder - On Monday, Jan 25, 1886. JOHN RYDER, aged 84 years, a native of West Port, County Mayo, Ireland. Chicago, Kenosha, Wis., Louisville, Ky., and Richland Centre, Wis., papers please copy 
Ryder, John (I1884)
 
50 1870 Federal census, Chicago, Convent of the Good Shepherd
Mary Filben, 17 years old, seamstress, born in Illinois, both parents of foreign birth.

1880 Federal census, Chicago
Household at 75 Peoria Street. Headed by Tom Logan, 40 years old, barber. Wife Mary, 26 years old, occupation "sews", born in Canada, father born in Ireland, mother born in Canada. Daughter Bertha, 8 years old, occupation "school", born in Illinois. Boarder Frank Colby, 21 years old, born in England, occupation "butcher", unemployed for 6 of the previous 12 months.

1895 Wisconsin census, Kenosha
Household headed by Mary Philben, includes 2 males and 1 female. Two born in the U.S., 1 born in Ireland.

1900 US Census, North Town, Chicago
Household on Belden Ave, headed by Mrs. M. Logan, born Feb 1865, born in Canada, both parents born in Ireland, occupation Nurse, rents home, able to read and write, speaks English, employed for 12 of the previous 12 months, mother of 1 child, that child is living. Daughter Bertha, born Jul 1872, born in Canada, both parents born in Canada, no occupation, able to read and write, speaks English.

1910 US Census, Chicago
Household on Fullerton Boulevard headed by Mari A. Logan, 56 years old, widowed, born in Canada, both parents born in Ireland, immigrated to the US in 1860, naturalized, occupation Housekeeper. Daughter Bertha, 37 years old, born in Illinois, father born in New York, mother born in Canada, occupation telegraph operator at Western Union. Sister Catherine Senechal, 52 years old, widowed, born in Canada, both parents born in Ireland, immigrated to the US in 1860, occupation seamstress. Lodger Frank Yule, 34 years old, occupation telegraph operator. 
Philbin, Mary (I2434)
 

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